Kennedy-trainingI hate running. Hate it with a deep burning passion. Why do I do it? Still trying to figure that one out. It all started in 2010 when I decided to run my first 5K. I ran the Jolly Jaunt through downtown Boston. It was cold and I thought I’d never make it, but I did and it felt great.  So, I started training to run a half marathon, I mean why not? I ran one in July of 2011 and crossing the finish line was unreal. I wanted to bottle that feeling and carry it with me. But you can’t and you are left with sore legs and a cool medal. Next step?  Might as well run Boston, right? So I did. On the hottest day ever. I crossed the finish line in a brisk 7 hour and 9 minutes.  Friends, I have yet to replicate that one.

KENNEDY half marathonAfter running Boston last year, I just lost something. I had to quit at the half marathon and felt terrible about it. I also caught a lot of shit for not finishing. People can be pretty mean on the internet. Fast forward a year – I’m ready to go again.

It’s the 2013 Napa to Sonoma Wine Country Half Marathon Destination Race on July 21st and training has started in earnest. And by earnest I mean training runs on Saturdays, and many week days spent making excuses as to why I’m not running that day.  (I blame Netflix for my inability to lace up shoes on workdays.) Last week we hit up DW Field Park which, to quote my coach, is a beautiful spot in an otherwise not so pretty place. It is a hilly three and a quarter mile loop which circles Brockton Reservoir and the day was perfect for it. We start as a group but packs quickly pull away and I’m usually on my own. In my patented run til I can’t breathe, then walk for a bit training plan, I took on these almost 4 miles with gusto.  The weather was perfect, the scenery was so beautiful and everyone I passed said hello. This is what I love about running in these types of places… real runners don’t go here. Real runners can be assholes. I do understand it, charity runners like me are slower, don’t know all the etiquette, and take numbers that a qualifier could have.  But seriously, running is for everyone, don’t be a dick. But I digress…

Kennedy:run Napa picWhy did I choose this half marathon? First off, I’m running with Team Challenge helping to fight Crohn’s and Colitis – both diseases are horrible, so any little bit I can do to help is great. Secondly, the race is in Napa and there is wine at the finish line. WINE AT THE FINISH LINE. The finish line is at Cuvaison Carneros Winery, which is a sustainable estate that produces distinctive chardonnays and pinot noirs and now I’m drooling. I plan on soaking up all Napa has to offer while I’m there and squeeze that half marathon in between tastings. In fact, I plan on having my post race meal delivered to the amazing tasting room.

Back to reality… I finished up my lap in a little under an hour. Let’s hear it for a 14 minute mile! Next Saturday it’s 6 miles, so I better get my butt in gear with the weekday runs, binge watching will be postponed to the next rainy day. I’ve got a ways to go in this journey, but it’s always the first step that is the hardest. And friends, nothing feels better than keeping a promise to yourself.

Eric Levin decided it was time to take a day of indulgence to a whole new level. styleboston visits Hidden Pond in Kennebunkport, Maine. Featuring a “farm-to-fork” dining room named Earth, massage sessions in a tree house, and an afternoon of yoga and cavorting on the beach.

From the runways of London to the streets of Boston, maximalist print mixing is au courant for Spring. Joseph Gordon Cleveland takes on the trend in a surrealist editorial shoot with photographer Eric Levin.

All apparel, accessories and shoes courtesy of Neiman Marcus Copley Place.

Photographs by ERIC LEVIN, Elevin Studios
Art Direction & Styling by JOSEPH GORDON CLEVELAND
Hair by JILL COLWELL, Studio 28
Makeup by STACEY FRASCA, Studio 28
Featuring OKSANA for Maggie Inc.

hat pic 3I had the pleasure of meeting hat designer Susan van der Linde and her husband yesterday at a trunk show to benefit the Emerald Necklace Conservancy for Party in the Park. But before I sat down to look at her beautiful hats, I was greeted with a friendly smile from owner Nicholas Penna and the lovely staff at Salon Capri. I was treated to a beautiful blowout and styling by expert stylist Graziella Lembo. I’ve never been to the salon, but was immediately taken by the inviting decor and comfortable clean sleek feeling. The atmosphere–distressed wood paneling juxtaposed with the clean white cabinets, was like being inside a Philippe Starck hotel.  I asked for something simple as to not overpower the hats, and Graziella styled my locks with ease and speed and made “making waves” seem like a piece of cake (although I know trying this at home would definitely not yield the same results!).

Susan van der Linde

Designer, Susan van der Linde

I walked over to chat with Susan and her husband Tom in the beautiful makeshift boutique and discovered that Susan and I had a lot in common. In addition to an eye for style, we shared a love of France; we had both lived in Neuilly while in Paris. Upon returning to the states, Susan eventually apprenticed with Don Marshall,  the ultimate hat designer who had designed hats for Grace Kelly in his day. After his death in 1995, Susan started her own business to keep up all the trade secrets she had learned from the master.

Named by Vanity Fair as one of the top 10 Milliners of Fascinators,  Susan describes her style as classic styles with a twist or pop of color or texture. I sat down with Susan to see what’s hot in hats.

Fascinator vs a full hat?

Tonya & Susan

Fascinators have their place and should frame the face of the woman. But hats are beautiful and more dramatic –  a woman needs to be certain of her ability to handle the attention wearing a full hat will give. If you are not confident enough to wear a full hat, then a fascinator is a very good option. They can be fun and whimsical and just as dramatic as a full hat too, worn by the right woman.

Trends in hats ?

Wide brim hat

Go big or go home!. Women want to go for drama. Hats seem to keep developing in materials, shape and how it frames the face of a woman. I am also seeing a lot of developments in texture and color. A Texan wants to look good from head to toe, so she is making sure her hat matches perfectly with her outfit, whereas a New Yorker is more concerned about being the perfect fashion plate, and about what others are wearing. Boston has a very polite crowd of hat wearers, who appreciate the beauty of other women’s hats.

Hat Etiquette-Europe vs. America?

Tonya with Fascinator

There are very strict rules about wearing hats in Europe, such as, if you are going to an event after 6pm, you would NEVER wear a hat. It makes sense because there is typically no longer bright sunlight after this hour. Europeans, especially the French, who I have the most experience with, are more sedate, they will wear a single color from head to toe–very monochromatic. It isn’t as exciting for me as a designer, so I spice it up by adding a fun color to a classic shape, or vice versa and a crazy shape in a more sedate color like taupe. I always enjoy giving a little bit of a wink too, like a bumble bee, or other jewel attachment–something the client provides, but I will certainly direct them as to where to pin it on the hat. In the US, rules are more lenient, and you can be more adventurous with your hat. Americans can easily change up the color of the hat, and don’t need to be dressed in a monochromatic palette. I like the flexibility of that, and find it  very satisfying as a designer.

Tonya & Susan

I had a great time with Susan trying on her hats, she had a way of placing them on my head in positions I would not have thought of myself. She tilted the hats more forward and worn this way it gave a sense of allure, as the eyes just peeked out slightly under the brim. I could use her help in my hat placement on May 13th, wonder if she’ll be in town? She helped pick perfect pieces to complement my face and body and I am confident she  chose the perfect hat for me. I highly recommend stopping by to shop her collection and at the very least to try on some of the most gorgeous hats of our time.

Susan van der Linde hat box

Susan will be taking walk-ins to shop her hats at Salon Capri until Thursday at 7pm, and will ship any special orders to arrive in time for The Party in the Park. 15% of the proceeds from trunk show item sales will be donated to the Justine Mee Liff Fund for the Emerald Necklace.

Party in the Park attendees are invited to book hair blowout and/or styling appointments for the morning of Party in the Park (May 13th) at any of SalonCapri’s three Massachusetts locations and the salon will donate 15% of the cost of services to the Justine Mee Liff Fund. Hair appointments can be booked via phone by calling: Boston/617-236-0020, Newton/617-969-1970 or Dedham’s Legacy Place/781-320-0900.

Photocredit: Lisa Richov

Steve heads down to Duxbury to discover where those delicious island creek oysters come from…but after this trip Steve can shuck with the best of them at Island Creek Oyster Bar

Mario Russo’s passion and inspiration extend far beyond hair. Terri Stanley takes a walk through some of Mario’s favorite exhibits at the ICA.

Dyeing to change your hair color? Join the club. There’s just something about the sun that makes me crave color, from florescent bright shoes, to bold lips, and sun-kissed hair, theres no better time to blossom into a new style than spring.

Retro Balayage

First seen in Vogue, Balayage, which was taken from the French word meaning “to sweep,” is a freehand technique in which swatches of hair are sectioned and hand painted against a backing board with a lightening agent. The coloring technique developed in the 1970’s is modern, chic, and creates depth and dimension thats perfect for some fun in the sun. Loved by Gisele Bundchen and those in the know, Balayage is the hottest way to brighten up your look this season.

Salon Mario RussoTo help me spring forward with a new hair-do, I turned to the talented Gina Mancinone, the general manager at Boston’s finest hair salon, Salon Mario Russo. After a consultation, Gina set me up with an appointment with master stylist Elle Proulx Cohen to cut my hair and “Bostons Best Colorist” John Brosnan, to help me heat things up with a new “do.”

For my hair transformation, I sat down with Elle who cut right to the chase by expertly layering my long locks to help add body and shape to my one dimensional hair. Since thick hair that is weighed down can be shapeless, Elle brought my locks back to life with layers to amp up my style power. “From soft face-framing layers to seamless volumizing ones, adding dimension to your cut while removing unwanted bulk is the perfect way to create a fresh new look” Elle told me.

Zoey & Elle

Next, I was off to see John for my Balayage. As a hair color virgin, I was thankful to be in the hands of a true artist like John who immediately made me feel at ease with his expert advice and warm nature. After a consultation, we decided less was more, so John created a “les reflets du soleil sur les cheveux” (sun-kissed hair) look by applying the Balayage around my face to emphasize movement and create depth. Balayage, which is also called “hair painting,” creates the most natural-looking results because the colorist paints on the highlights by hand. This method of lightening gives the colorist more control–and creates the illuminated highlights everyone wants this time of year.

Best of all?  Balayage is low maintenance, and gives a gorgeous healthy finish that looks nature-enhanced, glossy and luxe. Since healthy hair will never go out of style, John and Elle finished my hair transformation off with a treatment and gloss so my hair felt as beautiful as it looked.

Bottom line? Whether you’re looking to lighten up your hair color or are dying to debut a brand-new shade, spring is the perfect opportunity to make a change and the team at Salon Mario Russo will give you the best head of hair in town. Promise.

Zoey - After

Photographer: Lisa Richov


It’s been called a sport, a hobby, and even an art form.  In this “Detour,”styleboston brings you into the practice of navigating obstacles and leveraging one’s body through public spaces.

I am a proud member of “the club for husbands who survived the ‘first impression’ even though it was a disaster.” Most guys are not as lucky as I was if they did not make a good impression on the first date. On a professional level, most job candidates do not get a second chance if they do not leave a positive mark on the primary interview.

I googled the definition for “First Impression”. Here’s what I found on Wikipedia:

In psychology, a first impression is the event when one person first encounters another person and forms a mental image of that person. Impression accuracy varies depending on the observer and the target (person, object, scene, etc.) being observed.

Here’s my interpretation:

A First Impression is a one second preview of your personal brand. People will always look at you from the bottom up. Their perception will be greatly influenced by the shoes you choose to wear and the face with which you were blessed.

Basically we are saying the same thing. To quote the great Jay Z “I ain’t invented the game.”

Unlike life itself you can usually count on people to be fair, in the sense that they can be predictable but they will probably have some opinions based on how you choose to appear in front of them. You cannot dress to please everyone. However you can at least try to have some control over their judgements that may affect your life. Especially if their biased decisions are based solely on your appearance.

the bag ladyI’m not really a “bag” person but I think I have the potential to become one. However I have a few stumbling blocks to overcome. I have a good friend who sells handbags at Neiman Marcus so I often stop in to see her and look around. I like a lot of the bags, especially some of the small Chanel ones for spring. But I just can’t get past the price. Who pays $3900.00 for a small beige shoulder bag or $5,900.00 for the pink quilted one? Apparently a lot of people do, but I’m just not there yet. About 4 years ago a guy who used to do some personal shopping for me at Bloomingdales picked out a “Nancy Gonzales” bag that was on sale. I had never heard of Nancy Gonzales so it didn’t really impress me much when he said the bag was a steal at $985.00. I ended up buying it but I really don’t like it. It weighs a ton and the compartments are hard to find stuff in. But now I’m looking at a used Nancy Gonzales green crocodile bag online for $899.99 and I’m thinking, I could dig it.  But then I remember that two summers ago I bought a white no-name bag at Marshalls for about $37.00. I loved it, so much so, I resurrected it for last summer . When I mistakenly carried it into Gillette Stadium last September at the beginning of football season (they have a no bag policy)  I emptied the contents into a plastic see-thru Ziploc and put the white bag in the trash. Then, on my way out, I fished it out and took it home. It’s “had it” but I’m hoping to find a bag I like as much for this summer. So Kate Spade, Fendi, Marc Jacobs – what have you got? Otherwise it’s Marshall’s here I come.

Will S-photoIt’s well known that the French are great dog lovers, and that your pooch is welcome to enter almost any shop or restaurant that you are when you find yourself traveling with Fido in Paris.  But cats?  In a cafe in the tony 3rd arrondissement?  Cat lovers rejoice!  If your family is missing its feline member during your travels, there’s a place in France…

LE CAFE DES CHATS

Le Café des Chats now has two locations in the center of Paris.  The original one–which opened in 2013 in the Marais, a stone’s throw from the Centre Pompidou — proved so popular (reservations are recommended generally, and on weekends, essential) that its owners opened a second kitty emporium last autumn nearby in the 11th arrondissement, near the Place de la Bastille.  Marie-Claire of the Café des Chats told me that the second neighborhood “is very different and attracts yet a wider range of cat lovers.”

The lucky cats are all rescues that are being given another chance at life in an enviable situation.  While the cafe is not itself in the cat adoption business, a portion of its profits go to rescue activities.  “We wanted to show how a cat from a shelter is deserving and capable of affection,” says M-C.

Wiil S-Les Chats
Will SA:Les CHats

Les chats have pretty much free run of the place, although lunch guests are prohibited from feeding them table scraps, tempting though it may be. The cafe calls itself “un salon de thé et un restaurant,” and happily the food from its full-service kitchen is not an afterthought to the gimmick, but is absolutely delicious in a traditional Parisian way, and the management seeks out organic produce.  Both restaurant locations are open for lunch and dinner, and they also serve a yummy weekend brunch.  Our daughter had a croque monsieur, and her parents enjoyed a veggie-and-chevre quiche with a salad.  And a bowl of cream.

Is this proof that Parisians treat their pets better than they do their children?  Peut-etre.   Meeooooow…

Sean Flood

Sean Flood is a former street artist turned fine artist and somewhat of a local celebrity in Boston. His dynamic paintings of urban scenes and cityscapes are a reflection of his roots in construction and graffiti art. Flood harnesses the inherent intensity of graffiti, using line and form to build his paintings like the high-rises he depicts. Fresh off two very successful solo exhibitions at Kobalt Gallery in Provincetown and Childs Gallery in Boston, Sean sat down with us to discuss his art, his experiences, and his musings on how he got started as an artist.

HOW OLD WERE YOU THE FIRST TIME YOU PICKED UP A PAINTBRUSH? AND A SPRAY CAN?

I was a pencil guy from an early age – drawing as young as 8 years old – because painting scared me. I actually had my first show at 9! The Priscilla Beach Theatre [in Plymouth, MA] hosted a show – so it was coffee and hors d’oeuvres and then my doodles and cartoons on view.

I picked up a paint brush and a spray can – both probably around 15 years old.

Construction Chaos, 2014Sean Flood, American (b. 1982), Construction Chaos, 2014, Oil on Panel, 48 x 38 in.
Abington Woodshop, 2011Sean Flood, American (b. 1982), Abington Woodshop, 2011, Oil on canvas, 46 x 32 in.

WHAT WAS THE MOST EXCITING ASPECT OF BEING A GRAFFITI ARTIST?

Oh, definitely the rush of trying not to get caught. Then seeing it the next day, knowing you had gotten away with it. There’s a speed to graffiti art.

DID YOU EVER GET IN TROUBLE WITH THE AUTHORITIES FOR YOUR GRAFFITI ART?

Yes. I’ve been arrested three times, spent a couple of nights in jail, paid fines, had a probation officer, etc. One time I was painting the pier on Old Orchard Beach in Maine, during a camping trip, and I’m painting away and don’t notice a cop next to me until he taps on my shoulder.

I had to do community service sometimes. One of the best punishments I got was painting a mural for Boston City Lights – a dance studio in the South End. That was a great gig for a graffiti artist.

WHEN DID YOU DECIDE TO MOVE FROM GRAFFITI ART TO FINE ART?

It was really about getting caught, and I moved to painting to try and stay out of trouble. I was good at graffiti art, bad at getting away. Graffiti art continues to influence my technique though. At first, I would try to include hidden graffiti in each of my paintings, but now I just take inspiration from the quick technique and shapes of graffiti.

Sean Flood, American (b. 1982), Approaching Kenmore, 2013, Oil on panel, 26 x 28 in.

Sean Flood, American (b. 1982), Approaching Kenmore, 2013, Oil on panel, 26 x 28 in.

WHY CHOOSE THE CITY AS THE PRIMARY SUBJECT OF YOUR ARTISTIC IMPRESSION? AND HOW HAS YOUR EXPERIENCE IN CONSTRUCTION INFLUENCED YOUR ARTISTIC VISION?

I’ve always been interested in buildings.  My dad has been a builder in Boston his whole life. For me, growing up with that and working with him over the years has really drawn me to architectural subject.  The perspectives and deep space alone excite me.   In school, I tended towards figurative painting, but nowadays, I’m more drawn to cityscape paintings – there is more room there for me to develop ideas than with figurative painting, for now….

Patient View, 2014Sean Flood, American (b. 1982), Patient View, 2014, Oil on panel, 28 x 48 in.
Myrtle Stop Brooklyn, 2014.Sean Flood, American (b. 1982), Myrtle Stop Brooklyn, 2014, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

DO YOU PAINT FROM OBSERVATION OR IMAGINATION?

When I started out doing graffiti, I was focused on using the alphabet, and these raw, expressive marks. With my cityscapes, I’m trying to infuse some of that same expressive abstraction into my observed settings. Actually, right now I’m working on some paintings that are much more of a fleeting glance of a scene, a quick impression. There’s more room for imagination there.

WHERE WOULD YOU SAY YOUR ART IS GOING NOW?

In the short term, I’m hoping to get some inspiration from an upcoming trip to Europe. I’m headed to Rome, Naples, Venice – for the first time, Umbria, Basel and Ireland. I’m going to see the shows while I’m travelling – the Biennale for example, but also I’ll hopefully get a chance to paint some new places for me.

Sean Flood, American (b. 1982), Little Italy NYC, 2014, Oil on canvas, 28 x 22 in.

Sean Flood, American (b. 1982), Little Italy NYC, 2014, Oil on canvas, 28 x 22 in.

WHO IS YOUR FAVORITE HISTORICAL ARTIST?

In school I always liked Giacometti [Alberto Giacometti, 1901-1966], because of his expressive lines. He builds up forms through all of these different lines.

This is a tough question though. I mean I saw Van Gogh’s work in person in Amsterdam, and I was like “holy shit.”

Watch below to learn more about Sean: Video courtesy of Chris Engles

For the full interview watch here:

On Thursday evening, I was honored to host a night of style with heart for Diane Von Furstenberg to fête her Spring 2015 collection. Attendees of the exclusive in-store  event were asked to bring in a dress for Dress for Success Boston, a charity that promotes the economic independence of disadvantaged women by providing professional attire, a network of support, and the career development tools for women to thrive in work and in life. Guests enjoyed champagne, hors d’oeuvres from Met Back Bay, and mini makeovers from beauty guru Tavi De La Rosa as I presented DVF’s latest collection.

A celebration of this stature is fitting to those that own a DVF dress. After all, it’s easy to get wrapped up in a frock that allows a woman to exude feminine sultriness and womanly strength all while being versatile enough to be a witness in the evolution of the woman’s life who wears it.

While the dreamy notion of tiptoeing through the tulips may not be on the agenda for a few more weeks, to get inspired for the possibility of warm weather, I styled guests in this seasons hottest trends to assure they’d be stepping into spring on a sartorial high note.

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With that in mind, whether you’re looking for outfits for work, or play, I rounded up the most coveted DVF looks of the evening to make sure you too will be a stylish step ahead of the competition this Spring.

FLOWER POWER

DVF Kaden Dress

 

With patio parties and bridal showers to attend, its the perfect time to work Spring’s vivid romantic florals into your wardrobe. Bold in scale and color, the floral trend took over runways during fashion month. Whether you decide to go big and beautiful or minute and abstract, one things for sure, flower power is here to stay. Whether paired with denim for off-duty dressing, or heels for a cocktail party, florals are firmly back on the fashion map and will prove a worthy investment for your wardrobe in seasons to come. For an indispensable tunic style, look no further than the DVF Kaden to keep you bloomed to perfection this Spring. Featuring a clean v-neck, 3/4 sleeves and an A-line skirt in the season’s boldest prints, this style is sure to be your go-to all summer long.

THE SHIRT DRESS

Silk Prita Dress

 

As the climate varies from freezing to the very slight possibility of warmth, it becomes harder to tailor a working wardrobe. Enter the DVF Prita silk shirt dress. Light and airy, it can be gathered in or billowed out, and buttoned up or down. Best of all? The smart tailoring is versatile enough to effortlessly take you from power player to cocktail hour and anywhere in between.

GINGHAM

Gingham

 

Fall may have brought us proper plaids, but for spring it’s all about gingham. No longer just for picnics, gingham was spotted all over the runways. Diane von Furstenberg’s seized upon gingham for Spring 2015 and twisted it into something akin to daring and sexy — no small feat for a fabric often described as prim, and traditional. Inspired by glamour goddess Brigitte Bardot, DVF has managed to make gingham playful and yet sophisticated. Despite its many iterations, the fabric is a sartorial chameleon, so forget everything you know about gingham and try the freshly revamped fabric on for size.

CROP TO IT

DVF Jayme Dress

A crop top and ladylike skirt with waist-whittling proportions and only the subtlest flash of flesh can turn an evening look into something decidedly modern. Take the DVF Jayme for example. The corset top with flattering ruching detail is punctuated by a full floral skirt, with a little pop of midriff in between, making it the perfect subtle yet sexy twist on a classic dress.

THE LITTLE WHITE DRESS

The Little White Dress

The white slip dress—that iconic piece of nineties fashion—is finally having a renaissance. While this might be a matrimony favorite, Diane Von Furtsenberg’s white lace Olivette dress is for so much more than a walk down the aisle; from hot summer nights to easter brunch, theres no better time than the present to say yes to the little white dress.

So whether you’re looking to completely refresh your wardrobe with the latest trends, or simply seeking a few standout pieces to put a new spin on an old look, DVF Boston will have you stepping into Spring in style. Trust.

Take a peek at more photos from the evening.

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Hair: Salon Mario Russo

Photography: Lisa Richov

Music-The Runaway Club
You’ve heard of synth, indie, pop, and chill wave, but what about 80’s synth/pop mix? Step into the 80’s world with me as we explore this amazing solo band called The Runaway Club. Alan Poettcker, from Vancouver, British Columbia brings his active pop punk mix into his new album.

Since he was in high school, Alan loved everything music, from pop to discovering the synth. Coming from a musical family he started listening to bands like Brand New and Taking Back Sunday, which made him want to yell into the mic, thus starting his musical career. Alongside yelling into the mic, he also learned how to play bass guitar in middle school. Not only is he writing songs for his solo project, but he’s also a member of Chilliwack (British Columbia) based band called These Kids Wear Crowns.

Working on his album, “The Runaway Club” he likes to write geeky songs, play with certain tunes, and doesn’t really care in the end how it sounds. No pressure at all, just fun. His favorite song off the album is ‘Downhill from Here.’ He stated that it’s the only song that has actual drums at the end, where all his other songs are drum machines. It’s a song that builds the feeling of an open field with sounds. This works by freeing oneself from all things fear, because in the end you might as well live your life to the fullest. No regrets, which is why this song makes perfect sense.

Even though The Runaway Club isn’t planning on touring anytime soon, you can find the album on Spotify, Bandcamp, ITunes and more. Each track on this album has its own form of ‘dance until you drop’ catchiness and mature level to it. The smart kind of lyrics. Stop and listen to this album, and really understand where Alan’s mind is coming from. Because without lyrics, the beat wouldn’t mean much.

Okemo

Winter may be officially over, but there is a very vibrant, energetic group of people still skiing and they will be until the lifts are turned off. Okemo Mountain Resort has always been one of my favorite places to ski, they groom to let you zoom and when mother nature doesn’t deliver on the snow, the team at Okemo always does. From an alpine fashion standpoint, the sophisticates who make the quick trek up from the greater New York area always makes it a treat. The best people watching and style scouting can be found in the Jackson Gore area, where I always see the most interesting on-mountain looks. Once the aprés action starts, the Jackson Gore Lodge is teeming with well dressed people and I believe owner and fashion fan Diane Mueller must have had that in mind when she and husband Tim expanded Okemo and built this lodge. Here are some of my favorite looks from the always outstanding Okemo:

JUMPING JACK ALL FLASHSlope style

Where’s the party? Bet he knows! From his K2 special edition Rolling Stones Side Show skis, to his multi color gridlock print outwear by Sessions, this gentleman hit the hill ready to rock and roll. Mick Jagger said “Don’t you think it’s sometimes wise not to grow up?” Mick was right and everybody who skis and rides isn’t completely grown up when they play in the snow at Okemo. Just ask this guy…if you can catch him.

ROCK STAR / BOARDER / BADASS

Snow board or musical instrument, on the slope or on the stage – either way Ashley Cox just kills it. Her infectious energy can’t be contained and her choice of Aperture’s Peak to Creek printed jacket and pant is perfect for shredding it up on her Feather Snowboard by Burton. Check out her band Professional Victims and their new album “Fathom the Cosmos” because chicks that ride and rock rule.

LUX SKI SIREN

Slope style Fur hat

When Laura Aman strode into the Jackson Gore lodge, everybody noticed and I did a cartwheel. How I love seeing a gorgeous woman carry herself with such confidence and grace! Her beauty caught my eye but it was her incredible accessories that hooked me. Her amazing fur bomber hat and to die for Chanel bag, paired with basic black was aprés perfection. As warm as she is striking, Laura is a fashion executive with NSR Nina Runsdorf, the exquisite high end jewelry line favored by celebrities and style setters.

SPRING FORWARD

spring forwardSporting yellow that is anything but mellow, the fabulous Victoria K. from Washington DC  brought some elevated ski style to the top of the run. Her yellow and white Nautica ski jacket works like a charm with these super flattering,  3/4 zip pants by Marmot, and her pom pom hat brings the vibrant colors together perfectly.  Victoria works in an interior design firm that specializes in luxury hospitality and loves to ski because she finds it the perfect medium of personal expression.

GIRLS JUST WANT TO HAVE FUN

girls just want to have fun

Ali and Helena are uniform wearing students from Connecticut during the week, but once school is out it’s all about colorful jackets with printed ski pants. Popping with color against the snow, they don’t want to just look good, they demand performance from what they wear and mix brands to create their own unique looks. Ali’s Eider fuchsia jacket is nicely matched with her blue, swirl print Zoe technical pants by Sunice. Not to be outdone, Helena is giving us some tropical thunder by pairing her purple Patagonia jacket with farrow jungle print pants by North Face.

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