Walk for Hunger

Ellen Parker, the executive director of the anti-hunger organization Project Bread, is a leader in the national dialogue on poverty and hunger as a health crisis. During her tenure at Project Bread the organization has raised more than $100 million to help children and families who struggle to find their next meal. A major portion of those funds come from the East Boston-based Project Bread’s annual Walk for Hunger. On Sunday, May 3, the 47th annual Walk will take place. Ellen is a former senior policy adviser to Boston Mayor Ray Flynn and worked at area social service agencies before taking charge of Project Bread 16 years ago. A stylish, sought-after speaker with a professorial command of the devastating effects of hunger and nutrition, Ellen also knows her way around Boston’s neighborhoods, where she loves to shop and sample the traditional fare of the city’s newest immigrants.

Everyone knows about the Walk for Hunger, what else should people know about Project Bread?

As the only statewide anti-hunger organization in Massachusetts, Project Bread works to promote sustainable and reliable access to healthy food for all. Put simply, we want to end the public health crisis that is grounded in economic inequality and a fragmented food system. That’s why we work so hard to invest in the strength and resiliency of local communities—particularly in the public schools systems. There is no reason why children should leave school hungrie than when they arrived in the morning. And, we collaborate with others in building a robust regional food system from farmers, to food producers, to stores, anyone in the chain.

2014 Masses Shot

Project Bread’s Walk for Hunger is the most prominent in the country. Why is it so important to have regular people raising money and not just raise money in larger amounts from foundations or corporations?

The Walk for Hunger is a way for everyone to give back and raise awareness for anti-hunger work.  It is a movement that is much larger than a single donor, corporation or foundation. More than 40,000 people come together and show their support by walking 20 miles. Now that is a powerful message.

How is Project Bread different from other anti-hunger organizations? Does “anti-hunger” adequately describe your mission?

Project Bread is very much about that old, but wonderful saying: “Give a person a hand up, not a hand out.” People in the United States are so accustomed to seeing hunger within the narrow framework of charity and dependence that we think we know the answer. But we haven’t asked the most obvious question: how does the person facing food insecurity see their situation—and what do they truly need? If they had real choices about the kind of help they could receive, what would they choose and why? The most effective anti-hunger investments deliver multiple benefits. A healthy meal, first and foremost, but what if that meal could lead to new skills and better health? That’s what we call a “hand up.”

Is there a typical profile of a Massachusetts resident in need of food assistance? Is the need stronger in certain parts of the state than in others?

MPHA Award - Ellen and Kirk David LeiferNo, unfortunately we cannot predict where and when people will face this. Everyone has a different story. Everyone has a different background. What we do know is that those who are earning minimum wage or less are typically in need of food assistance. For too many working families—thousands of families in Massachusetts—no matter how hard they work, they cannot reliably protect themselves from hunger. The long-term answer is simple: people need to earn a living wage.

What’s a common misconception about hunger both in Massachusetts and nationwide?

When the head of household works fulltime, her or she should earn enough money to pay the rent and put food on the table. That is not a reality. To achieve that outcome requires broad collaboration among wage earners and political, civic, religious and business leaders. But, interestingly, anti-hunger advocates across the country are will to speak up for charity, but when challenged to speak out for a living wage, those same leaders are conspicuous by their silence.

You live and work in one of the most ethnically diverse neighborhoods Boston. Any favorite places you like to eat and go food shopping?

East Boston has some of the best food in the city. I love Angela’s on Eagle Hill and everyone in the office knows about Rino’s because it was featured on the Food Network. My go-to is Meridian Market, a favorite of the late Mayor Tom Menino. I also love shopping at Market Basket for the fresh food and the company’s commitment to the community. Now that spring is in the air, I can’t wait to revisit our local famer’s market. East Boston has residents from all over the globe and the local market reflects those cultures.  On a given day I can find anything from papalo, a South American version on arugula, to Asian mustard to collard greens to sweet Thai basil.

ART TALK 10_Vanitas, or Models (An Homage to Goya's 'Majas on a Balcony'), 2006First interested in the arts at 16 and still painting nearly every day at 93 years old, Anne Lyman Powers has had a prolific artistic career – to put it mildly. Born in Boston and educated at institutions such as Vassar, Columbia and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Powers devoted any free time she had growing up to studying, painting and sculpture.   An early influence on her work was politics, reinforced by her experience traveling in pre-WWII Europe. In 1937, at 15 years old, Powers got a firsthand glimpse of Nazi Germany and its propaganda campaign against contemporary art, branding the work of modernists and expressionists as “Degenerate.”   Powers herself would explore expressionist work in her painting, and back home in Boston, aligned herself with the Boston Expressionists. Later, changes in her personal life also meant changes in her art. Once married, Powers turned to her everyday life to mine it for subject matter – capturing vacation spots, social gatherings, and her family.   However, her eye for political satire didn’t remain dormant for long, and she continues to explore political themes in her work to this day.

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Vancouver-Sleep-Clinic_2471-1024x641We all dream of that chill night, where all you want to do is tune out the world. You need that one band or artist, who will motivate you to grab that glass of wine, sit on the couch with a roaring fire or help you ease into that bubble bath. Look no further, because Vancouver Sleep Clinic is the perfect background music to make that happen. Tim Bettinson, a talented 17 year old Australian from Brisbane grew up listening to his dad’s Eagles and Fleetwood Mac records. He later found his EUREKA moment after listening to Bon Iver’s album, For Emma, Forever Ago and the band “Sigur Ros”. He fell in love with modern pop and decided that he wanted to channel a bit of his idols into his music. Taking hints from Bon Iver, you can hear how soulful Bettinson’s voice is on his tracks “Collapse” and “Vapour”.

What does the name Vancouver Sleep Clinic really mean to Bettinson? The music creates an atmosphere that people could fall asleep to, hence the Sleep Clinic part. But as for Vancouver, it’s just a beautiful place, no explanation needed.

After months of assembling lyrics from his math books, notes, whiteboards, his bedroom walls and of course an old laptop, his EP “Winter” was born (2014). His song “Collapse” has been featured in TV shows such as “The Vampire Diaries”, “Teen Wolf”, “Eye Candy”, “The Guardian”, the new hit series “The Royals” and much more.

Bettinson says that his dream is to be playing a 10-piece band in forests, castles and canyons. It’s never been his goal to be in the spotlight; his goal is to give people a collective experience and to have fun. So for now, step into the soothing world, relax, and take in the beautiful sounds of Vancouver Sleep Clinic.

Follow him on twitter @vcsleepclinic. Listen to him on ITunes, Spotify, Soundcloud, and visit his website: www.vscsounds.com

 

Terri Stanley was fortunate enough to interview the late Evelyn Lauder in 2010 for season 2 of styleboston. Mrs. Lauder told us that the idea for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation’s “Think Pink” and its pink ribbons was hatched over a cup of coffee at her kitchen table, and has grown into a worldwide campaign. A true lady, Mrs. Lauder could teach people a thing or two about grace.  Watch this Power Player segment below and continue on for more information about the 2015 Boston Hot Pink. (styleboston will be on site at this year’s gala to catch all the action for a good cause.)

“I’ve never met a more gracious woman. She was without pretense or arrogance–truly amazing.”

-Terri Stanley

The BCRF is celebrating its 10th year anivarsary Thursday, May 14th at the Seaport World Trade Center.

Boston Hot PinkHonoring:
ELIZABETH HURLEY
The Estee Lauder Companies Global Ambassador for
Breast Cancer Awareness
AMY ROBACH & ANDREW SHUE
National Humanitarians
BCRF 2014-2015 NEW ENGLAND GRANTEES 
Local Scientific Research Pioneers
CONNECT W/THE BCRF:
#HotPinkBOS #InYourHands

 

 

Chewy 1styleboston and my family lost a very dear and loyal friend yesterday and I would like to say a few words about this special little guy. 
#1-he either liked you or he did not…and it was usually not. Chewy was a Brussels Griffon, a funny and spirited breed that always prefers one on one’s to an open door invite. He was a fierce watchdog and could rumble with the best of the Goldens and Labs.
#2-He does NOT look like the “Star Wars” character Chewbacca, Chewbacca looks like him. Apparently George Lucas had several Griffons when he created the infamous character so let’s get the record straight once and for all… I believe that really irked Chewy.
#3-For such a little guy he instilled a lot of fear in some people. Numbering a dozen or so at last count, he’s a “take no prisoners” kind of guy…likes a good nip here and there. But if he loved you, he really loved you.

Rest in peace Chewy, we miss you already ♥

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Vision

I was invited to serve as a professional reviewer for the Fashion Design Department at MassArt. It’s an honor to be invited to participate in this Review, and my third year being asked back. I took a close look at the portfolios, sketches, and actual garments of the four students I was assigned. Get to know the four fabulous and fashionable students below and take a peek at their designs. styleboston will be on site for the event titled “Vision” — taking place at The Castle on Columbus Ave on May 9’th.

Daniela Cabal

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Kimberly Gale Nowers

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Carolina Espaillat

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Nicole Oppedisano

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Kennedy-trainingI hate running. Hate it with a deep burning passion. Why do I do it? Still trying to figure that one out. It all started in 2010 when I decided to run my first 5K. I ran the Jolly Jaunt through downtown Boston. It was cold and I thought I’d never make it, but I did and it felt great.  So, I started training to run a half marathon, I mean why not? I ran one in July of 2011 and crossing the finish line was unreal. I wanted to bottle that feeling and carry it with me. But you can’t and you are left with sore legs and a cool medal. Next step?  Might as well run Boston, right? So I did. On the hottest day ever. I crossed the finish line in a brisk 7 hour and 9 minutes.  Friends, I have yet to replicate that one.

KENNEDY half marathonAfter running Boston last year, I just lost something. I had to quit at the half marathon and felt terrible about it. I also caught a lot of shit for not finishing. People can be pretty mean on the internet. Fast forward a year – I’m ready to go again.

It’s the 2013 Napa to Sonoma Wine Country Half Marathon Destination Race on July 21st and training has started in earnest. And by earnest I mean training runs on Saturdays, and many week days spent making excuses as to why I’m not running that day.  (I blame Netflix for my inability to lace up shoes on workdays.) Last week we hit up DW Field Park which, to quote my coach, is a beautiful spot in an otherwise not so pretty place. It is a hilly three and a quarter mile loop which circles Brockton Reservoir and the day was perfect for it. We start as a group but packs quickly pull away and I’m usually on my own. In my patented run til I can’t breathe, then walk for a bit training plan, I took on these almost 4 miles with gusto.  The weather was perfect, the scenery was so beautiful and everyone I passed said hello. This is what I love about running in these types of places… real runners don’t go here. Real runners can be assholes. I do understand it, charity runners like me are slower, don’t know all the etiquette, and take numbers that a qualifier could have.  But seriously, running is for everyone, don’t be a dick. But I digress…

Kennedy:run Napa picWhy did I choose this half marathon? First off, I’m running with Team Challenge helping to fight Crohn’s and Colitis – both diseases are horrible, so any little bit I can do to help is great. Secondly, the race is in Napa and there is wine at the finish line. WINE AT THE FINISH LINE. The finish line is at Cuvaison Carneros Winery, which is a sustainable estate that produces distinctive chardonnays and pinot noirs and now I’m drooling. I plan on soaking up all Napa has to offer while I’m there and squeeze that half marathon in between tastings. In fact, I plan on having my post race meal delivered to the amazing tasting room.

Back to reality… I finished up my lap in a little under an hour. Let’s hear it for a 14 minute mile! Next Saturday it’s 6 miles, so I better get my butt in gear with the weekday runs, binge watching will be postponed to the next rainy day. I’ve got a ways to go in this journey, but it’s always the first step that is the hardest. And friends, nothing feels better than keeping a promise to yourself.

Eric Levin decided it was time to take a day of indulgence to a whole new level. styleboston visits Hidden Pond in Kennebunkport, Maine. Featuring a “farm-to-fork” dining room named Earth, massage sessions in a tree house, and an afternoon of yoga and cavorting on the beach.

From the runways of London to the streets of Boston, maximalist print mixing is au courant for Spring. Joseph Gordon Cleveland takes on the trend in a surrealist editorial shoot with photographer Eric Levin.

All apparel, accessories and shoes courtesy of Neiman Marcus Copley Place.

Photographs by ERIC LEVIN, Elevin Studios
Art Direction & Styling by JOSEPH GORDON CLEVELAND
Hair by JILL COLWELL, Studio 28
Makeup by STACEY FRASCA, Studio 28
Featuring OKSANA for Maggie Inc.

hat pic 3I had the pleasure of meeting hat designer Susan van der Linde and her husband yesterday at a trunk show to benefit the Emerald Necklace Conservancy for Party in the Park. But before I sat down to look at her beautiful hats, I was greeted with a friendly smile from owner Nicholas Penna and the lovely staff at Salon Capri. I was treated to a beautiful blowout and styling by expert stylist Graziella Lembo. I’ve never been to the salon, but was immediately taken by the inviting decor and comfortable clean sleek feeling. The atmosphere–distressed wood paneling juxtaposed with the clean white cabinets, was like being inside a Philippe Starck hotel.  I asked for something simple as to not overpower the hats, and Graziella styled my locks with ease and speed and made “making waves” seem like a piece of cake (although I know trying this at home would definitely not yield the same results!).

Susan van der Linde

Designer, Susan van der Linde

I walked over to chat with Susan and her husband Tom in the beautiful makeshift boutique and discovered that Susan and I had a lot in common. In addition to an eye for style, we shared a love of France; we had both lived in Neuilly while in Paris. Upon returning to the states, Susan eventually apprenticed with Don Marshall,  the ultimate hat designer who had designed hats for Grace Kelly in his day. After his death in 1995, Susan started her own business to keep up all the trade secrets she had learned from the master.

Named by Vanity Fair as one of the top 10 Milliners of Fascinators,  Susan describes her style as classic styles with a twist or pop of color or texture. I sat down with Susan to see what’s hot in hats.

Fascinator vs a full hat?

Tonya & Susan

Fascinators have their place and should frame the face of the woman. But hats are beautiful and more dramatic –  a woman needs to be certain of her ability to handle the attention wearing a full hat will give. If you are not confident enough to wear a full hat, then a fascinator is a very good option. They can be fun and whimsical and just as dramatic as a full hat too, worn by the right woman.

Trends in hats ?

Wide brim hat

Go big or go home!. Women want to go for drama. Hats seem to keep developing in materials, shape and how it frames the face of a woman. I am also seeing a lot of developments in texture and color. A Texan wants to look good from head to toe, so she is making sure her hat matches perfectly with her outfit, whereas a New Yorker is more concerned about being the perfect fashion plate, and about what others are wearing. Boston has a very polite crowd of hat wearers, who appreciate the beauty of other women’s hats.

Hat Etiquette-Europe vs. America?

Tonya with Fascinator

There are very strict rules about wearing hats in Europe, such as, if you are going to an event after 6pm, you would NEVER wear a hat. It makes sense because there is typically no longer bright sunlight after this hour. Europeans, especially the French, who I have the most experience with, are more sedate, they will wear a single color from head to toe–very monochromatic. It isn’t as exciting for me as a designer, so I spice it up by adding a fun color to a classic shape, or vice versa and a crazy shape in a more sedate color like taupe. I always enjoy giving a little bit of a wink too, like a bumble bee, or other jewel attachment–something the client provides, but I will certainly direct them as to where to pin it on the hat. In the US, rules are more lenient, and you can be more adventurous with your hat. Americans can easily change up the color of the hat, and don’t need to be dressed in a monochromatic palette. I like the flexibility of that, and find it  very satisfying as a designer.

Tonya & Susan

I had a great time with Susan trying on her hats, she had a way of placing them on my head in positions I would not have thought of myself. She tilted the hats more forward and worn this way it gave a sense of allure, as the eyes just peeked out slightly under the brim. I could use her help in my hat placement on May 13th, wonder if she’ll be in town? She helped pick perfect pieces to complement my face and body and I am confident she  chose the perfect hat for me. I highly recommend stopping by to shop her collection and at the very least to try on some of the most gorgeous hats of our time.

Susan van der Linde hat box

Susan will be taking walk-ins to shop her hats at Salon Capri until Thursday at 7pm, and will ship any special orders to arrive in time for The Party in the Park. 15% of the proceeds from trunk show item sales will be donated to the Justine Mee Liff Fund for the Emerald Necklace.

Party in the Park attendees are invited to book hair blowout and/or styling appointments for the morning of Party in the Park (May 13th) at any of SalonCapri’s three Massachusetts locations and the salon will donate 15% of the cost of services to the Justine Mee Liff Fund. Hair appointments can be booked via phone by calling: Boston/617-236-0020, Newton/617-969-1970 or Dedham’s Legacy Place/781-320-0900.

Photocredit: Lisa Richov

Steve heads down to Duxbury to discover where those delicious island creek oysters come from…but after this trip Steve can shuck with the best of them at Island Creek Oyster Bar

Mario Russo’s passion and inspiration extend far beyond hair. Terri Stanley takes a walk through some of Mario’s favorite exhibits at the ICA.

Dyeing to change your hair color? Join the club. There’s just something about the sun that makes me crave color, from florescent bright shoes, to bold lips, and sun-kissed hair, theres no better time to blossom into a new style than spring.

Retro Balayage

First seen in Vogue, Balayage, which was taken from the French word meaning “to sweep,” is a freehand technique in which swatches of hair are sectioned and hand painted against a backing board with a lightening agent. The coloring technique developed in the 1970’s is modern, chic, and creates depth and dimension thats perfect for some fun in the sun. Loved by Gisele Bundchen and those in the know, Balayage is the hottest way to brighten up your look this season.

Salon Mario RussoTo help me spring forward with a new hair-do, I turned to the talented Gina Mancinone, the general manager at Boston’s finest hair salon, Salon Mario Russo. After a consultation, Gina set me up with an appointment with master stylist Elle Proulx Cohen to cut my hair and “Bostons Best Colorist” John Brosnan, to help me heat things up with a new “do.”

For my hair transformation, I sat down with Elle who cut right to the chase by expertly layering my long locks to help add body and shape to my one dimensional hair. Since thick hair that is weighed down can be shapeless, Elle brought my locks back to life with layers to amp up my style power. “From soft face-framing layers to seamless volumizing ones, adding dimension to your cut while removing unwanted bulk is the perfect way to create a fresh new look” Elle told me.

Zoey & Elle

Next, I was off to see John for my Balayage. As a hair color virgin, I was thankful to be in the hands of a true artist like John who immediately made me feel at ease with his expert advice and warm nature. After a consultation, we decided less was more, so John created a “les reflets du soleil sur les cheveux” (sun-kissed hair) look by applying the Balayage around my face to emphasize movement and create depth. Balayage, which is also called “hair painting,” creates the most natural-looking results because the colorist paints on the highlights by hand. This method of lightening gives the colorist more control–and creates the illuminated highlights everyone wants this time of year.

Best of all?  Balayage is low maintenance, and gives a gorgeous healthy finish that looks nature-enhanced, glossy and luxe. Since healthy hair will never go out of style, John and Elle finished my hair transformation off with a treatment and gloss so my hair felt as beautiful as it looked.

Bottom line? Whether you’re looking to lighten up your hair color or are dying to debut a brand-new shade, spring is the perfect opportunity to make a change and the team at Salon Mario Russo will give you the best head of hair in town. Promise.

Zoey - After

Photographer: Lisa Richov


It’s been called a sport, a hobby, and even an art form.  In this “Detour,”styleboston brings you into the practice of navigating obstacles and leveraging one’s body through public spaces.

I am a proud member of “the club for husbands who survived the ‘first impression’ even though it was a disaster.” Most guys are not as lucky as I was if they did not make a good impression on the first date. On a professional level, most job candidates do not get a second chance if they do not leave a positive mark on the primary interview.

I googled the definition for “First Impression”. Here’s what I found on Wikipedia:

In psychology, a first impression is the event when one person first encounters another person and forms a mental image of that person. Impression accuracy varies depending on the observer and the target (person, object, scene, etc.) being observed.

Here’s my interpretation:

A First Impression is a one second preview of your personal brand. People will always look at you from the bottom up. Their perception will be greatly influenced by the shoes you choose to wear and the face with which you were blessed.

Basically we are saying the same thing. To quote the great Jay Z “I ain’t invented the game.”

Unlike life itself you can usually count on people to be fair, in the sense that they can be predictable but they will probably have some opinions based on how you choose to appear in front of them. You cannot dress to please everyone. However you can at least try to have some control over their judgements that may affect your life. Especially if their biased decisions are based solely on your appearance.

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