Currently viewing the tag: "Italy"

D.H. Lawrence once wrote that, “Design in art, is a recognition of the relation between various things, various elements in the creative flux. You can’t invent a design. You recognize it, in the fourth dimension. That is, with your blood and your bones, as well as with your eyes.” As an interior designer at Troy Boston I have set out to design a space that focuses on “The Art of Function” in Italian design. Drawing inspiration from designers like Eero Saarinen, I have teamed up with expert curator of Italian furnishings and owner of Sedia, Dan Weldon, to help me evoke the architectural allure of Italy, a land as rich in history as it is in culture, and artisanal mastery.

Featured designs from Vibieffe, Toneilli and Saba Italia. Designed by Gianluigi Landoni, Paolo Grasselli and Sergio Bicego.

In our continuous quest for craftsmanship and inspiration, Dan set out to Milan Design Week to explore some of the new collections at the Salone del Mobile — a sprawling, citywide celebration of the most innovative, and most exclusive offerings in furniture and design.

Vessels by Kose designed by Rosaria Rattin.

This year, Milan Design Week was all about the palazzo, with several exhibitions hosted in these spectacular historic residences, dripping with purple wisteria.

Slim lines, muted colors and the use of natural materials mixed with marble and glass seemed to be the common theme among the exhibitors, Dan told me. There was a strong focus on compact and modular furnishings, which stood out in contrast to the more grand collections.With accent colors ranging from bold oranges and leafy greens to purples, and pastels, its safe to say that designers are embracing the warmer tones in lieu of colder polished finishes.After touring our Troy Boston unit, Dan and I hope you’ll feel at home and be inspired by the Milanese spirit. After all, “A ogni uccello il suo nido è bello.” (To every bird his nest is beautiful.)

Lorena AutoriLorena Autori, who has starred as a guest chef at Boston’s own Rialto Restaurant, offers private cooking classes in her home, which is located in an historic building in the very center of the drop-dead charming medieval hill town of San Gemini.

After we reached Lorena initially via email, she first let us choose our menu well ahead of time from a wide selection of tantalizing options.  We selected things that our daughter would eat and also dishes that we felt that we could later prepare at home.  Lorena was delightful to chat with while she performed wonders in her kitchen, during the very little “down time” we had…as she worked us quite hard!  And had a lot of fun.

Together we whipped up some amazing delicacies, including gnocchi made from scratch (JUST the right variety of potatoes, peeled after boiling, and pushed through a ricer), a special Umbrian version of pesto, polpette di pollo (chicken croquettes), vegetarian stuffed peppers, batter-fried zucchini blossoms stuffed with mozzarella, and an awesome lemon cream tart. (She even contributed on her own a special local dessert that she thought our daughter would like, since there wasn’t enough time for us to bake two desserts.)

The whole cucina italiana experience with Lorena, while intense and focused for almost four hours, was an absolute delight. And then we ate! Buon appetito!

 

CONTACT INFO:
Lorena Autori
Percorsi con Gusto
Via Casventino, 4
05029 San Gemini
Italy ‬
Tel. +39.3347769989‬‬‬‬
PRICES & AVAILIBILITY:
Umbria or Boston – PERCORSICON GUSTO

 

ONE-STOP SHOPPING:
Doubting your abilities to communicate in Italian? Crack tour guide Alessandro Manciucca in San Gemini can book this for you, and arrange for a visit to a family-run winery, in a small Umbrian town.
Allessandro can be reached at www.dreavel.com

 

DerutaAlthough my partner U.B. and I are both artists with a keen appreciation of art history, when our family booked a week-long visit to Umbria during our ten-year-old daughter’s spring break this year, we wanted to do something other than the typical visit to churches and art museums.

We spent a memorable morning at a Craftsman Workshop in the famous ceramics town of Deruta. You’ve no doubt seen, or bought, some of the pricey and precious plates, espresso cups or soup tureens made by the artisans of Deruta, with their traditional swirls and griffon shapes meticulously painted on glossy high-fired porcelain. When we learned that we could make our own at the authentic, no-frills ceramics studio called MAIOLICHE ARTISTICHE GORETTI, we said, “Sign us up!”U.B. painted plateWe loved that it was off the beaten path of ceramic factories. The husband-and-wife team of Umberto and Vania were extremely patient with us beginners. Their passion for their craft, which has occupied them for 25 years, shone through. Umberto was delightful with our daughter Stassa, who modeled low-fire bowls, which she personalized for our dog and our cat. In the meantime U.B. and I focused on the fine art of centuries-old decoration of dinnerware. Vania made sure that we followed the rules, after we “pounced” the design with a bag of charcoal onto the unfired white plate or cup. If we put a stroke of light blue rather than a stroke of the dark blue on that wing of the griffon, she would smile and firmly let us know that, no, THIS is the right color for that feather on that wing: SEMPRE (ALWAYS)! Then she would scrape the stroke away with a sharp knife, and we would do it properly.

We thought that the €70 per person price tag for a half-day session was quite reasonable, and afterward we couldn’t resist buyingsome of the Gorettis’ own (admittedly more professional) serving dishes and bowls. But our own creations are our real treasures.finished pottery

www.ceramichegoretti.com

CONTACT INFO:
Via Vincoli 7/9
06053 Deruta PG
Italy
Tel. +39 075 971 0048
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“Cacio e Pepe”

My husband’s very favorite pasta sauce is also one of the world’s simplest. We both fell in love with this Roman specialty, a creamy twirl of fresh pasta, hot with crushed black pepper, during our time in residence at the American Academy in Rome, after a friend introduced us to the charms of the old Jewish Ghetto. There, on the Piazza delle Cinque Scuole, behind an unmarked door at number 30, is one of the smallest trattorias in the city, Sora Margherita.

You need to become a “member” of Sora Margherita because of local licensing, but this essentially means filling in a form. We were introduced in this loud and crowded little watering hole to the simple marvel that is pasta cacio e pepe. The cooks at Sora Margherita serve it over a delectable egg tonnarelli (a variation on long, flat fettucine), but any long pasta will do. The quality of the pasta is as important as the freshness of the few ingredients.

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Jan SaragoniJan Saragoni is usually so busy running her eponymous public relations and communications firm that trying to schedule a photo shoot proved impossible. That’s why we had to snap this shot of her in her “casual Mondays” garb shortly after she left her firm’s headquarters, which also double as the second floor of her Cambridge residence. A Boston native who initially trained as a reporter, Jan knows every short cut from here to there and can rattle off every hotspot, former hotspot and the site of every great news story or moment of history along the way. Unfortunately, she drives like she is from Boston and has yet to offer a reasonable explanation as to why her closest friends and family members refer to her as “Jane” or “Janie.”  She is fluent in Italian, and holds an Italian passport, which makes it all the more confusing why she owns a home on the Greek island of Hydra. The styleboston.tv staff has learned that she has been asked by friends in the publishing world — who should know better — to consider writing a book or travel piece about her Hellenic adventures.  Jan has suggested “Under the Trojan Sun” as a possible title and can’t understand why that might not be as clever an idea as she thinks it is.

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Moodboard ReginaNot just pizza.

What side of the track are you on?

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