Currently viewing the tag: "New York City"

Guest Contributor: Dylan Connor

THE MUSTS

  • Ultimate Value Driven Destinations within a 20 block radius.
  • The Transport: By car from Boston; Walking.

THE STAY

The Morgans Hotel – Madison Ave

Morgans Hotel Dining

Located at 237 Madison Ave., the Morgans Hotel is the original jewel in Ian Shrager’s boutique hotel empire. The instinctively modernist interiors are timeless and were created by the emissary of Parisian chic:Andre Putnam. This hotel is full of thoughtful luxury including rainfall showerheads, down duvets and pillows, Malin & Goetz bath amenities and complimentary breakfast, complete with homemade granola and classic New York bagels. It remains a best kept value secret in town with an unbeatable location.

THE EATS

The Meatball Shop -9th & 22nd

The Meatball Shop

The Meatball Shop – 9th and 22nd streets (one of five locations). They’ve got balls and a not so secret weapon in chef Daniel Holzman, who hails from Le Bernadin. He and business partner Michael Chernow have created an irreverent and nostalgic haven of affordable comfort foods with a best in class aura. Locally sourced meats (Heritage Pork, Creekstone Farms Beef and Murray’s Chicken, which they grind themselves) are transformed into an innovative menu that is frugal in its pricing yet high in style and flavor. Dig in to the Meatball Smash – two balls on a Brioche bun with sauce and cheese or a purely simple slider. Wash it down with a Shop Specialty Cocktail: the Fool-Aid Punch ( brandy, rum, citrus and grape sugar) or a Homegrown Classic: Moscow Mule: Brooklyn Republic (vodka, lime and ginger beer). Whiskey lovers should check out the whiskey grid. Have it neat or cleverly disguised in a Whiskey float with Vanilla (citrus liqueur, root beer and vanilla ice cream). And finally, we suggest The Sweet Ending: an ice cream sandwich concocted with house-made ice cream and freshly baked cookies. Our favorite? Chocolate chip with brown sugar ice cream. That’s just the surface of a comprehensive menu that does not disappoint.

Virgil’s BBQ-44th right off Times Square

Virgils Times Square

 

Located on 44th Street, Virgil’s real barbecue is right off Times Square in the heart of the Theater District. Classic Roadhouse décor sets the tone in an atmosphere that is casual and welcoming. The streamlined service is a fast and friendly group of aspiring actors. Stick with Virgil’s favorites and you can’t miss. Two genuine Southern Pride Smokers churn out the tastiest Carolina Pulled Pork and BBQ Chicken in the North. Split an order of Trainwreck fries or BBQ nachos. (These are not for the faint of heart in portion or calories.) Beer aficionados may rejoice in choosing a flight of “Three of Your Choice,” or indulge in Virgil’s Own Ale, Coney Island Lager or Skrumpies Cider.

THE RAMBLE — Central Park

The Shakespeare Garden

Shakespeare Garden

Central Park is 843 acres that were curated by preeminent landscape architect Frederick law Olmsted in 1858. With daily official guided or self-guided tours, we have three scintillating suggestions and they’re free!: Brush up on your Shakespeare! Don’t miss The Shakespeare Garden, named for the famed English poet and playwright and includes four enchanting acres of scattered quotes, flowers and plants all drawn from his illustrious works.

The Chess & Checkers House

The Chess & Cracker House

For the gamer in all of us- compete in The Chess and Checkers House—BYOC or borrow Chess, Checkers or Backgammon and Dominos.

The Carousel

The Carousel

The Carousel—Legend has it that the original ride was powered by a live mule or horse hidden beneath the carousel platform. Today’s vintage carousel was found in an old trolley terminal on Coney Island. It was crafted in 1908 by the Brooklyn firm Stein & Goldstein and is considered one of the finest and largest examples of American Folk Art in existence. With its 57 majestic horses, it is the fourth to stand in Central Park since 1871.

THE SHOWS

Hedwig and the Angry Inch- Starring John Cameron Mitchell

Hedwig and the Angry Inch

“Hedwig and the Angry Inch” starring writer/creator John Cameron Mitchell, at the Belasco Theatre. The Tony-winning revival has been updated and revamped from the original Off-Broadway and film versions, which serves the larger-than-life character of Hedwig well. Mitchell is a true manifestation of stage charisma, and the music seamlessly bridges rock’n’roll and musical theater. The Tony-winning lighting design by Kevin Adams rounds out a glamorous, hilarious, and heartfelt experience. Day-of lottery tickets provide great seats for a very low price.

Finding Neverland — with Matthew Morrison and Kelsey Grammer

finding neverland

“Finding Neverland,” starring Matthew Morrison, Laura Michelle Kelly, and Kelsey Grammer, at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre. Directed by the incomparable Tony-winner Diane Paulus with fantastic music by first-timers Gary Barlow and Eliot Kennedy, it is also a first for Harvey Weinstein as a Broadway producer. It is a surprisingly sympathetic turn from Morrison, complemented with grace by Kelly, and rounded out by Grammer’s panache. The simply designed set perfectly frames Paulus’ elegant staging and the stunning choreography from Mia Michaels of TV’s “So You Think You Can Dance” fame. An overall excellent adaptation of the 2004 film, while still establishing its own style and take on the story of J.M. Barrie and his inspiration for “Peter Pan.” Stand in line a few hours before the box office opens, and experience the spectacle from amazing seats for an incredibly affordable price.

magicParis, Texas and Chicagoland is Where It All Starts for this band. Magic Man is a five-piece, major label, synth rock band from Boston. Formed in 2010, they released their first EP You Are Here in September 2013, followed by their first major full-length release, Before The Waves on July 8, 2014. In February 2014, their song Paris debuted at #39 on the alternative charts and in March 2014, Alt Nation debuted Paris at #1 on the Alt 18 countdown. Also in March, they decided it was time to take things to the next level and perform at the well-known Austin, Texas festival (SXSW) alongside other bands such as Smallpools, Grouplove, New Politics and more. Shortly after opening for these bands, they embarked on their west coast US tour, headlining for the first time alongside Panic! At The Disco and Walk the Moon.

If you’ve listened to these guys, you’re probably familiar with their Passion Pit vibe. They released their first music video (PARIS), which debuted on VH1’s Mid Morning Buzz with Nick Lachey, and in a few days they sold out their first concert in NYC. Signed to Columbia Records, this band is a must see.

Happy to say that I’m friends with such a talented band. Make sure to see them this year as they headline a show near you.

Michael DePaulo

Fashion designer Michael DePaulo is having a good year. Last February, the Boston native made his Palm Beach debut to critical acclaim and is getting ready to launch a new bridal and ready-to-wear line in December. Known primarily for his cocktail, evening and special occasion designs, DePaulo’s use of sophisticated lines with an innovative edge has attracted an A-list clientele that includes media and sports powerhouse Linda Pizzuti Henry and Tony Award-winning theater director Diane Paulus. We recently caught up with the handsome and peripatetic 34-year-old over coffee in the South End, where we talked about the intersection of fashion, design and architecture as well as the joys of the perfect plate of pasta.

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Jason MargacaJason Margaca has been in professional media production for more than 12 years. Getting his start in music and audio production, he quickly found that his passion for sound wasn’t the only thing he had his eye on. Getting behind the camera he found as exhilarating as putting in a 12-hour studio session.

Jason has composed music and done audio work for video games, film, commercials, promotional videos, and artists in an around Boston and New York City. In his years of being in video production, he has also worked with multiple companies and organizations and has filmed commercials, narratives, short films, television, music videos, corporate videos, and promotional videos.

His passion for all things creative is his driving force and he holds this in extremely high regard. Now involved with the Boston/New York City based V-Neck Media. He loves getting in from the ground floor of any project and working on the creative ideas, storytelling, and planning that truly brings every project to life.

Recently opened at the PS1 division of MoMA is Ryan Trecartin’s new video installation: Any Ever.  The show consisted of the artist’s 2007 – 2010 body of work, produced in Miami with Lizzie Fitch, the artist’s longtime collaborator.  Trecartin is a Houston native who graduated from RISD in 2004, and has since gone on to receive multiple awards and has been in numerous shows, including the 2006 Whitney Biennial, the Younger Than Jesus show at the New Museum in New York, and solo exhibitions at the Power Plant in Toronto and MOCA in Los Angeles.

Trecartin is a visual mastermind when it comes to condensing and representing the influence of technology in the day to day lives of the majority of the first world.  His work creates an ADHD paradise where discursive thought processes become hyper shortened, reflecting how our phenomenological understanding has transmogrified since technology’s inception.

Images and text and sound and time: nothing isn’t disorienting in his work, and this hyper-culture that is created serves a double duty – it shows technology’s capabilities in video art and editing, it also makes me fear for my life.  Trecartin creates turbulent webs consisting of memes and pop culture references that are punctuated by larger questions of gender identity, cultural and racial stereotypes, and the problematic nature of the current job market.

Each cleverly layered frame (literally – he uses transparency and overlays in editing like his life depends on it) works to build a universe that is questioning what our values have become, what is worthwhile to us as a species, and how we externalize thoughts and feelings in a world where direct human contact is quickly losing importance.

Any Ever consists of 6 videos of varying lengths in 6 separate rooms, each decked out in strange and incongruous mixtures of commonplace household items and other rather odd groupings of items that we commonly associate with middle-to-upper class living.  Example:  a room of white leather Ikea chairs, 1 hammock, and a centrally located metal picnic bench, all surrounded by large zipped up luggage bags.  Each ‘seat’ has a pair of headphones attached, where the sound to the video plays at a volume level just a couple notches above comfortable.  The whole experience is beyond disorienting (I had to take a break in the middle and come back to finish the last three videos), and this is further substantiated by Trecartin’s extensive exploration of the fuzzy areas between gender, race, and ethnicity.

Despite the silliness and entertaining nature of many of these videos, each is so over the top it does not fail to question issues of a graver nature.  The artist does not shy from macabre and unflattering depictions of humanity, and his disjointed and frenetic chopped and screwed narratives hold your attention just long enough to make you fear for your future.

The show will be up at PS1 MoMA, located in Long Island City, until the 3rd of September.   Watch more clips on Trecartin’s Vimeo Channel.

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