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Mario Russo’s passion and inspiration extend far beyond hair. Terri Stanley takes a walk through some of Mario’s favorite exhibits at the ICA.

Dyeing to change your hair color? Join the club. There’s just something about the sun that makes me crave color, from florescent bright shoes, to bold lips, and sun-kissed hair, theres no better time to blossom into a new style than spring.

Retro Balayage

First seen in Vogue, Balayage, which was taken from the French word meaning “to sweep,” is a freehand technique in which swatches of hair are sectioned and hand painted against a backing board with a lightening agent. The coloring technique developed in the 1970’s is modern, chic, and creates depth and dimension thats perfect for some fun in the sun. Loved by Gisele Bundchen and those in the know, Balayage is the hottest way to brighten up your look this season.

Salon Mario RussoTo help me spring forward with a new hair-do, I turned to the talented Gina Mancinone, the general manager at Boston’s finest hair salon, Salon Mario Russo. After a consultation, Gina set me up with an appointment with master stylist Elle Proulx Cohen to cut my hair and “Bostons Best Colorist” John Brosnan, to help me heat things up with a new “do.”

For my hair transformation, I sat down with Elle who cut right to the chase by expertly layering my long locks to help add body and shape to my one dimensional hair. Since thick hair that is weighed down can be shapeless, Elle brought my locks back to life with layers to amp up my style power. “From soft face-framing layers to seamless volumizing ones, adding dimension to your cut while removing unwanted bulk is the perfect way to create a fresh new look” Elle told me.

Zoey & Elle

Next, I was off to see John for my Balayage. As a hair color virgin, I was thankful to be in the hands of a true artist like John who immediately made me feel at ease with his expert advice and warm nature. After a consultation, we decided less was more, so John created a “les reflets du soleil sur les cheveux” (sun-kissed hair) look by applying the Balayage around my face to emphasize movement and create depth. Balayage, which is also called “hair painting,” creates the most natural-looking results because the colorist paints on the highlights by hand. This method of lightening gives the colorist more control–and creates the illuminated highlights everyone wants this time of year.

Best of all?  Balayage is low maintenance, and gives a gorgeous healthy finish that looks nature-enhanced, glossy and luxe. Since healthy hair will never go out of style, John and Elle finished my hair transformation off with a treatment and gloss so my hair felt as beautiful as it looked.

Bottom line? Whether you’re looking to lighten up your hair color or are dying to debut a brand-new shade, spring is the perfect opportunity to make a change and the team at Salon Mario Russo will give you the best head of hair in town. Promise.

Zoey - After

Photographer: Lisa Richov

Conv W-Andris-lead photo

All eyes are on the energetic – and telegenic  — Andris Nelsons when he bounds across the stage of Boston Symphony Hall to take his place at the conductor’s podium, his sheer physicality a performance unto itself. At 35 years old, Nelsons is one of the youngest and most electrifying conductors on the international scene today and the youngest music director to lead the BSO in more than 100 years. He might also be the only one to have ever been a student of martial arts. Prior to his arrival in Boston, the Latvia native was music director of the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (CBSO), where he earned critical acclaim. Born in Riga to a family of musicians, Nelsons began his career as a trumpeter in the Latvian National Opera Orchestra before studying to be conductor. He is married to the internationally renowned soprano Kristine Opolais, who joined him on stage for his first opening night leading the storied Boston Symphony Orchestra.

AS A YOUNG CONDUCTOR, WHAT DID THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA MEAN TO YOU? WHAT WERE YOUR FIRST IMPRESSIONS?

As a music student growing up in Latvia, I was aware of the leading position of the Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO), one of the world’s greatest orchestras. I followed the careers of several BSO‘s legendary music directors, especially Serge Koussevitzky, Charles Munch, Erich Leinsdorf, and Seiji Ozawa, and more recently, James Levine. I remember listening to many BSO recordings and feeling overwhelmed by the extraordinary performances.  I never imagined that I would become this orchestra’s music director!

WHAT’S BEEN THE BIGGEST SURPRISE ABOUT BOSTON AUDIENCES FOR YOU SO FAR?

The enthusiasm that the Boston audiences has shown to me, has touched me deeply. I have always heard that the Boston audiences were passionate music lovers—and it is very true!  They also are generous in expressing pride and love for the orchestra. The BSO has been a great inspiration and joy for many of our patrons. My hope is to do all I can to continue to inspire them to ever greater levels of satisfaction and reward.

nelsons-big-9836

IS THE ORCHESTRA DIFFERENT TODAY THAN WHEN YOU FIRST GUEST-CONDUCTED IN 2011?

I don’t know that I can speak to how different the orchestra is today than it was in 2011.  When I conducted the orchestra for the first time in March 2011, I was overwhelmed by the beauty and power the orchestra displayed in Mahler’s Ninth Symphony.  It is a very difficult piece of music, but we developed quickly a good connection and were able to make incredible music together. My joy nearly four years later comes from getting to know the orchestra better. I enjoy meeting and getting to know each individual musician, knowing them by name. This helps us work better together and make some great music.

WE’RE IN THE AGE OF “NEW” MEDIA. DID YOUR TRAINING AS A MUSICIAN AND A CONDUCTOR PREPARE YOU FOR YOUR NEW ROLE AS HOLOGRAM AT SYMPHONY HALL?

I have never participated in the creation of a hologram before, so it was fun to see how they created the 3D image. It’s both strange and exciting to stand next to your own talking and moving hologram – and I was happy to see that I have lost some weight since recording the image last July! I hope our wonderful patrons enjoyed this technology, and that the hologram and overall exhibit communicated some interesting and new information, especially to newcomers to the BSO.

IS THE ROLE OF CONDUCTOR OF A WORLD-CLASS ORCHESTRA OF THE 21’ST CENTURY DIFFERENT THAN IT WAS FOR YOUR HISTORIC COUNTERPARTS?

I would say that it is a faster moving world today, of course it is, and this pace applies to all aspects of modern life! However, in contrast, the fundamental role of the conductor has not changed so much at all on the podium. This profession is still based on personal communication and it rather stands the test of time in this sense. It’s such a magical and of historic profession.

BOSTON HAS A REPUTATION FOR BEING A FAIRLY TRADITIONAL CITY. CAN YOU GIVE US A PREVIEW OF ANY EXCITING, NEW WORK YOU’LL BE INTRODUCING?

The Boston Symphony Orchestra has always presented many new interesting compositions with major composers as Bartok, Hindemith, Stravinsky, Babbitt, Birtwistle, Carter, and Saariaho, and many others, and also significant premieres.  So there is no doubt that with the great repertoire that we all love so deeply—music of Brahms, Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, etc.—we will also explore works by new composers and go back to some of the works of the 20th and 21st centuries that have made the recent history of classical music.  Sophia Gubaidulina’s Offertorium is a great example of bringing back a late 20th century work that is now considered a masterpiece of our field—and Baiba Skride’s recent performances captured the extraordinary sound of Ms. Gubaidulina’s composition. This season we’ve also programmed works by Boston composers Gunther Schuller, John Harbison, and Michael Gandolfi, as well as works by Australian composer Brett Dean and my Latvian compatriot Eriks Esenvalds. Our audiences have responded very enthusiastically to what we have performed so far. We will continue to explore new works and bring the very best of music to our wonderful patrons.

For further information about the Boston Symphony Orchestra and a complete spring schedule, visit Boston Symphony or click here for complete programs, ticket information, photos, press documents, and artist bios.

Paul Endres Jr., American (b. 1985) The Surviving Members of the Sullivan Seven, 2014 Oil on panel, 36 x 36 inches

Paul Endres Jr., American (b. 1985)
The Surviving Members of the Sullivan Seven, 2014
Oil on panel, 36 x 36 inches

You might think that running Childs Gallery, one of Boston’s most established purveyors of fine art, would mean that Richard Baiano is stuffy, living like a citizen of the mid-20th century. But you would be wrong. Very wrong. Richard and his business partner, Stephanie Bond, who have co-owned the gallery since 2009, are constantly on the prowl looking for the next great artist all while honoring the 70-year history of the Newbury Street gallery that was founded by Charles D. Childs. Baiano got the art bug while working as an architect at GUND Partnership. We check in with him not just about the current state of Boston’s visual arts scene, but where he thinks it is going and which artists will be blazing that trail

 

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I’ve never been a blogger; never thought I would, but here goes nothing. I’ve been doing some things in my life lately that I’ve never tried before. New things, things that I never knew I wanted to do. One of them is meditating. It’s actually really, really, really difficult. I find that when I close my eyes and try to focus on clearing my mind, it’s possibly the hardest thing I’ve ever done. I don’t think I have one breath rotation before I have to start over again.

On Tenterhooks

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Alfred Fiandaca

“I’m happy being anonymous.”

Those were the words told to us by a man whose designs have been worn for decades by pop culture’s greats, such as, Audrey Hepburn, Julie Andrews, Joan Kennedy, Nancy Reagan, Joan Collins, Ann Romney… just to name a few.

The late Alfred Fiandaca became a preferred fashion designer to some of the most affluent women in politics and entertainment in the last half century and whose stylings have become as timeless and beloved as the women who wear them. Before he passed on February 9th in his Palm Beach home at age 72, the East Boston native sat down with us to share his thoughts on his lifetime of achievements. Though, don’t expect any basking in the glory of being a favorite of powerful and beautiful women. Fiandaca was in love with the fashion…not fame.

“I’ve only worked maybe 14 days in my life. Because everyday is a joy. I don’t work. I just do what I do and have a good time doing it,” said Fiandaca.

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John Fleuvog has long been a go-to shop for men and women who expect their footwear to be distinct, fun, and quirky. The designs are whimsical yet classically cool, and each is expertly constructed. The company’s tagline, Unique Shoes for Unique Souls, isn’t just a clever play on words, it’s a style truism: from wingtips to high-top sneakers, the signature designs add a fanciful flourish to any wardrobe, and to the wearer. Few companies can call their offerings art, but Fleuvog has as great a claim to the title as any brand in the market.

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Call your boss, invent some elaborate excuse–cholera, for example–but whatever you have to do: TAKE TOMORROW OFF.

Daniela Corte, the inimitable Boston-based designer who is unimpeachably chic as she is talented, is celebrating the recent opening of her flagship boutique with… A SAMPLE SALE. Yes, you read that correctly. And don’t think I don’t know you’re drooling over there. Get a damn napkin, will ya?

Get your shopping gear on (read: easy-on-easy-off-clothes-and-shoes, and seamless underwear, as always): it’s game time! The sample sale will include feather-weight silk blouses in an array of prints and colors, Corte’s signature body-slimming silhouettes– a perfectly-cut pencil skirt, for example–, statement-making brocade capes, and streamlined evening gowns with make-’em-look-twice plunging necklines.

And though the recent onset of blistering cold may not exactly bring you back to the lazy haze of Summer, this sale is a damn good opportunity to snatch up some of Corte’s signature swimwear. If it’s good enough for Sports Illustrated (Corte was featured this year), it’s good enough for me.

Discounts as steep as 80% off original retail means prices will mostly hover in the $20 to $50 range. 

Move aside, Forever 21 and H&M: snapping up your investment-worthy treasure finds at Daniela Corte Sample Sale is Smart Shopping 2.0.

DANIELA CORTE SAMPLE SALE

Friday, 12/9 – Sunday, 12/11
FRI & SAT| 11AM-7PM // SUN | Noon-5PM
211 Newbury Street
Boston, MA 02116
P | (617) 608-4778


If you haven’t already pre-planned your outfit, I suggest you run over to Newbury Street or the Pru ASAP. Fashion’s Night Out may be three weeks away, but keep in mind you’re going to be amongst Boston’s most fashionable civilians. Your every-day driving moccasins and khaki pants simply won’t do.

Circle September 8, 2011 on your calendars as a celebratory evening filled with an overload of fashion, fun, and cocktails. Fashion’s Night Out is the perfect occasion to prove to GQ (and ourselves) that we are not the worst dressed city in the U.S. So please, dress and shop accordingly.

As the purpose of this nightlong party is to restore consumer confidence during these hard economic times, make sure to pack your debit card in your clutch. This year Boston is officially celebrating Fashion’s Night Out. The event started in NYC in 2009 by Vogue Magazine, the CFDA, NYC & CO and the City of New York. Participating Boston retailers including Newbury Street, South End, North End, SOWA, JP, Roslindale, and more.

For one night and one night only, shopping will be extended from 6 through 11pm throughout the city. In addition, for the first time in 15 years Newbury Street will be shut down. Feel free to jaywalk from shop to shop.

Rumor has it Aveda of Copley Place will be offering complimentary mini-facials. Festivities at Zara will include a celebrity DJ and a decadent Champagne bar. There’ll be a custom flip book photo booth at Diane Von Furstenberg and shoppers will be given a sneak sample of the brand’s new fragrance, DIANE.

To see more details on these events and other FNO happenings throughout the city, check out the Fashion’s Night Out Boston website.

On the site launched this week, you can begin scheduling  your night of shopping and purchase a Fashion’s Night Out t-shirt.  Trust me, with abstract cityscape print and signature Fashion’s Night Out logo, it’s much cooler than your worn-in university tee or American Apparel v-neck. Plus, with forty percent of proceeds raised from sales going to the NYC AIDS Fund in the New York Community Trust, it’s a purchase you won’t feel guilty about.

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Those of you who read my Letter from the Editor last week know that I spent the Sunday prior in Gloucester, slaving away on a photo shoot. I didn’t tell you why or whatfor because, these days, I like to keep my secrets.

That said, the results are now ready! I have to admit the day ended up being far more fun than it was work (due largely to the crew I worked with, and largely to the phenomenal weather that day…).

So take it in, kids: one of the last vestiges of summer. As a California transplant, I’d say I did all right, non?

All clothes courtesy of Neiman Marcus & Stel’s; all shoes courtesy of Sperry. For purchasing info, leave a comment and we’ll give you the details…

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