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It’s not always easy being a vegetarian in Spain. Because I also eat fish and seafood–and I live in Barcelona, which is smack on the sea–it’s a challenge, but it’s not impossible. In Madrid, I would call it impossible. There is a big deli there, for instance, called El Museo del Jamón.  Generally, all over Spain there is a general suspicion of those who do not follow the cult of the slaughtered cow and pig. That small club would include both my husband U.B. and me.

So, we greet with joy the discovery of an extraordinary Spanish dish that is not based on meat. And there is a family of soups whose ingredients have never been near a pig.  The chilled soups are a refreshing thirst-quencher in the parched southern reaches of Spain’s Andalucia, where summer days can be broiling.

GAZPACHO

Everybody knows about gazpacho, the perfect chilled tomato-garlic-and-vegetable first course on a hot day, and in Spain it is as readily available in the local grocery store as orange juice.  My family slugs it down right from the carton if we’re on the road, and it’s one of our daughter Stassa’s favorite after-school snacks.  Still, nothing beats the homemade version, which is not difficult to make in either a blender or a food processor; recipes abound on the Internet.  Crucial to its success is the crunch factor of the accouterments that you add when serving gazpacho at your table:  diced green (or red) pepper and cucumber, little cubes of fresh tomato, and crispy croutons of bread that have been toasted with olive oil.  I like a sprig of rosemary or basil in mine.

 

 

SALMOREJO

Salmorejo from gildedfork.com

Salmorejo from gildedfork.com

The other tomato-based soup that has not found the international fame of its cousin gazpacho is called salmorejo.  A search for the etymology of the word led me nowhere, but it almost certainly has something to do with salt (“sal”) in spite of its being not exceedingly salty.  When I plug the word salmorejo into Google translate, the English translation is…(fanfare): “Gazpacho!”

As far as I can tell (after hundreds of tastings), salmorejo, whose origins are in the Andalucian city of Córdoba, varies from its more famous cousin mostly in the inclusion of a higher proportion of bread amongst its ingredients, which renders the soup a slightly lighter shade of red, and considerably thicker, than your average bowl (or glass) of gazpacho.  The ingredients list is also shorter, focusing on vine-ripened tomatoes, green olive oil, garlic and bread.  It is often garnished with cubes of ham and hard boiled egg.

AJO BLANCO

Ajo Blanco from Mercado Calabajio.

Ajo Blanco from Mercado Calabajio.

An unsung cousin to the red chilled soups is little known outside of Andalusia, and almost completely unheard of outside of Spain.  The secret of the creamy white, refreshingly chilled ajo blanco or “white gazpacho” summer soup seems to be well guarded.

U.B. and I first discovered ajo blanco in the swank restaurant of one of Spain’s most charming paradores, a converted fourteenth-century Moorish castle in Carmona, outside of Seville. Since my lactose-tolerance is not high, I at first shied away from the white soup in spite of U.B.’s swooning response to it. Only after asking the waiter, “Que es esto?” and hearing the list of ingredients, did I dive in and become a life-long fan.

Ajo blanco is more than the sum of its parts. In fact, the ingredients at first seem to be seriously at odds with each other: Bread. Almonds. Olive oil. Grapes. Vinegar. And of course garlic (ajo).

 

Here is a recipe, freely adapted from a version that I found at EPICURIOUS.COM:

Toast several slices of country bread without its crusts and soak in a cup of ice water.

Toast about a dozen sliced almonds in a skillet until golden, then grind them in a processor with one clove of garlic.

Squeeze the bread dry and add it to the almond/garlic mixture, along with half a pound of seedless green grapes.

Process until smooth then put it into a bowl and mix it together with 3 Tbsp. of wine vinegar, a half cup of extra virgin olive oil and two cups of ice water.

Strain it through a sieve, forcing as much bread through as possible. Add salt and cayenne pepper, and chill well, at least one hour.

Serve the soup with freshly toasted croutons and more green seedless grapes, cut in half.  I know it sounds weird, but trust me.

Once while traveling around the south of Spain, we came across a thicker, dip-like version of ajo blanco, which is usually a rather thin soup. Quite a surprise and just as yummy.

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D.H. Lawrence once wrote that, “Design in art, is a recognition of the relation between various things, various elements in the creative flux. You can’t invent a design. You recognize it, in the fourth dimension. That is, with your blood and your bones, as well as with your eyes.” As an interior designer at Troy Boston I have set out to design a space that focuses on “The Art of Function” in Italian design. Drawing inspiration from designers like Eero Saarinen, I have teamed up with expert curator of Italian furnishings and owner of Sedia, Dan Weldon, to help me evoke the architectural allure of Italy, a land as rich in history as it is in culture, and artisanal mastery.

Featured designs from Vibieffe, Toneilli and Saba Italia. Designed by Gianluigi Landoni, Paolo Grasselli and Sergio Bicego.

In our continuous quest for craftsmanship and inspiration, Dan set out to Milan Design Week to explore some of the new collections at the Salone del Mobile — a sprawling, citywide celebration of the most innovative, and most exclusive offerings in furniture and design.

Vessels by Kose designed by Rosaria Rattin.

This year, Milan Design Week was all about the palazzo, with several exhibitions hosted in these spectacular historic residences, dripping with purple wisteria.

Slim lines, muted colors and the use of natural materials mixed with marble and glass seemed to be the common theme among the exhibitors, Dan told me. There was a strong focus on compact and modular furnishings, which stood out in contrast to the more grand collections.With accent colors ranging from bold oranges and leafy greens to purples, and pastels, its safe to say that designers are embracing the warmer tones in lieu of colder polished finishes.After touring our Troy Boston unit, Dan and I hope you’ll feel at home and be inspired by the Milanese spirit. After all, “A ogni uccello il suo nido è bello.” (To every bird his nest is beautiful.)

Guest Contributor: Dylan Connor

THE MUSTS

  • Ultimate Value Driven Destinations within a 20 block radius.
  • The Transport: By car from Boston; Walking.

THE STAY

The Morgans Hotel – Madison Ave

Morgans Hotel Dining

Located at 237 Madison Ave., the Morgans Hotel is the original jewel in Ian Shrager’s boutique hotel empire. The instinctively modernist interiors are timeless and were created by the emissary of Parisian chic:Andre Putnam. This hotel is full of thoughtful luxury including rainfall showerheads, down duvets and pillows, Malin & Goetz bath amenities and complimentary breakfast, complete with homemade granola and classic New York bagels. It remains a best kept value secret in town with an unbeatable location.

THE EATS

The Meatball Shop -9th & 22nd

The Meatball Shop

The Meatball Shop – 9th and 22nd streets (one of five locations). They’ve got balls and a not so secret weapon in chef Daniel Holzman, who hails from Le Bernadin. He and business partner Michael Chernow have created an irreverent and nostalgic haven of affordable comfort foods with a best in class aura. Locally sourced meats (Heritage Pork, Creekstone Farms Beef and Murray’s Chicken, which they grind themselves) are transformed into an innovative menu that is frugal in its pricing yet high in style and flavor. Dig in to the Meatball Smash – two balls on a Brioche bun with sauce and cheese or a purely simple slider. Wash it down with a Shop Specialty Cocktail: the Fool-Aid Punch ( brandy, rum, citrus and grape sugar) or a Homegrown Classic: Moscow Mule: Brooklyn Republic (vodka, lime and ginger beer). Whiskey lovers should check out the whiskey grid. Have it neat or cleverly disguised in a Whiskey float with Vanilla (citrus liqueur, root beer and vanilla ice cream). And finally, we suggest The Sweet Ending: an ice cream sandwich concocted with house-made ice cream and freshly baked cookies. Our favorite? Chocolate chip with brown sugar ice cream. That’s just the surface of a comprehensive menu that does not disappoint.

Virgil’s BBQ-44th right off Times Square

Virgils Times Square

 

Located on 44th Street, Virgil’s real barbecue is right off Times Square in the heart of the Theater District. Classic Roadhouse décor sets the tone in an atmosphere that is casual and welcoming. The streamlined service is a fast and friendly group of aspiring actors. Stick with Virgil’s favorites and you can’t miss. Two genuine Southern Pride Smokers churn out the tastiest Carolina Pulled Pork and BBQ Chicken in the North. Split an order of Trainwreck fries or BBQ nachos. (These are not for the faint of heart in portion or calories.) Beer aficionados may rejoice in choosing a flight of “Three of Your Choice,” or indulge in Virgil’s Own Ale, Coney Island Lager or Skrumpies Cider.

THE RAMBLE — Central Park

The Shakespeare Garden

Shakespeare Garden

Central Park is 843 acres that were curated by preeminent landscape architect Frederick law Olmsted in 1858. With daily official guided or self-guided tours, we have three scintillating suggestions and they’re free!: Brush up on your Shakespeare! Don’t miss The Shakespeare Garden, named for the famed English poet and playwright and includes four enchanting acres of scattered quotes, flowers and plants all drawn from his illustrious works.

The Chess & Checkers House

The Chess & Cracker House

For the gamer in all of us- compete in The Chess and Checkers House—BYOC or borrow Chess, Checkers or Backgammon and Dominos.

The Carousel

The Carousel

The Carousel—Legend has it that the original ride was powered by a live mule or horse hidden beneath the carousel platform. Today’s vintage carousel was found in an old trolley terminal on Coney Island. It was crafted in 1908 by the Brooklyn firm Stein & Goldstein and is considered one of the finest and largest examples of American Folk Art in existence. With its 57 majestic horses, it is the fourth to stand in Central Park since 1871.

THE SHOWS

Hedwig and the Angry Inch- Starring John Cameron Mitchell

Hedwig and the Angry Inch

“Hedwig and the Angry Inch” starring writer/creator John Cameron Mitchell, at the Belasco Theatre. The Tony-winning revival has been updated and revamped from the original Off-Broadway and film versions, which serves the larger-than-life character of Hedwig well. Mitchell is a true manifestation of stage charisma, and the music seamlessly bridges rock’n’roll and musical theater. The Tony-winning lighting design by Kevin Adams rounds out a glamorous, hilarious, and heartfelt experience. Day-of lottery tickets provide great seats for a very low price.

Finding Neverland — with Matthew Morrison and Kelsey Grammer

finding neverland

“Finding Neverland,” starring Matthew Morrison, Laura Michelle Kelly, and Kelsey Grammer, at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre. Directed by the incomparable Tony-winner Diane Paulus with fantastic music by first-timers Gary Barlow and Eliot Kennedy, it is also a first for Harvey Weinstein as a Broadway producer. It is a surprisingly sympathetic turn from Morrison, complemented with grace by Kelly, and rounded out by Grammer’s panache. The simply designed set perfectly frames Paulus’ elegant staging and the stunning choreography from Mia Michaels of TV’s “So You Think You Can Dance” fame. An overall excellent adaptation of the 2004 film, while still establishing its own style and take on the story of J.M. Barrie and his inspiration for “Peter Pan.” Stand in line a few hours before the box office opens, and experience the spectacle from amazing seats for an incredibly affordable price.

Kennedy

Training for the Napa to Sonoma half-marathon continues…

This week our training consisted of running a 6K road race in Brockton. It was the same place we had run a couple of weeks ago, so I was familiar with the terrain. Which normally would be a good thing, you know the lay of the land as it were, you know where the big hill is, and you know when to kick into gear near the end. For some reason this works in reverse for me. If I’ve done it before it just psyches me out. I have little voices in my head telling me to quit before I’ve even begun. AND IT’S ONLY 3.75 MILES. What happens when we have to run more? I seriously need to find a way to get out of my own way.

I have tried running with music, with audiobooks, with podcasts, and with nothing but the wind in my ears. Nothing seems to make it stop. In fact, I think the only way I can get that little voice to shut it’s shit-talking mouth is to talk to it. But, funnily enough, talking while running alone gets you mad side-eye from people you pass. But for some reason I prefer talking to myself. Well, I should be more precise, arguing with myself. Maybe it’s because I’ve lived alone for so long, but conversing with myself is something I do all the time. At home, at work, at Foodies while deciding on ground grass-fed beef or bison, (the little voice wants Bison, my voice wants whats cheap) but it just sounds weird when you are running.

Now that you think I’m a total psychopath, please know my doctor says talking to yourself is totally normal. So don’t worry about my brain, it has an entire village of people tending to it. But I digress.

Moo

I’m so excited to get to Napa and run this sucker. And drink a lot of wine. And find this guy at the Charles Creek Tasting Room.

Her name is Ms Moo-lot and she’s made entirely of wine corks. How cool is that? I have a great love for that which falls under the heading of “Roadside Americana” and finding kitch like this in a fancy place like Napa/Sonoma brings me joy.

runningI finished the 6K a little faster than I had run the course last time, so high five for me! And my entire team was there at the finish line to cheer me on. Team Challenge is full of warriors and I’m so honored to be a part of this amazing group!

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Téa Leoni and Madeleine Albright

Téa Leoni and Madeleine Albright

She shattered the glass ceiling, becoming the first female US Secretary of State. Madeleine Albright, who paved the way for a progressive future in government, was recently seen at The White House Correspondent’s Dinner with another of our favorite Power Players, Téa Leoni. Terri Stanley sat down with Madame Secretary on a previous trip to Boston to talk about her pin collection and the political and diplomatic significance behind them. Find out what she said about Hillary Clinton, Wellesley College, democracy and the pin she wore for Saddam.

Tiziana Dearing has had a lot of experience dealing with the cycles of poverty. Jan Saragoni sat down with Tiziana when she was CEO of Boston Rising in 2011 to discuss her efforts to change people’s understanding of poverty. She is currently an Associate Professor of Macro Practice at the School of Social Work at Boston College and was recently seen on Greater Boston with Jim Braude talking about the situation in Nepal.

Bliss
Your wedding day will be here faster than you can say “I do,” and while you’ve probably already chosen the perfect venue, a photographer to capture your most precious moments, and a wedding dress that’s sure to make your groom’s heart skip a beat, you may have overlooked one important tradition… a bridal shower!
After all, now that he’s put a ring on it, its time to celebrate with your best friends! Since there’s no better way to shower the bride than to relieve the stress of planning a wedding, a relaxing spa day is the ideal venue for some pre wedded bliss.
champs
Looking to find the perfect spa? Piece of cake, right? Well, it depends on how you slice it. Since the bride should be the true centerpiece of the day, choosing a venue that makes your experience all about her is a must. Enter Bliss Spa. The exclusive spa, located in the W Hotel, is a luxe oasis of calm, where you and your friends will be greeted with champagne and desserts to be enjoyed in a tranquil, chic lounge. From here, each guest is taken to be ped-ied, man-ied, massaged, and pampered to perfection by the talented Bliss Spa staff. Post-treatment, the group is led back to the private lounge to enjoy hors d’oeuvres, desserts, dancing, and a chance to toast the bride-to-be!
Bliss Spa
After experiencing the bridal spa package myself, (I know what you’re thinking, tough day on the job) I’ve decided that Bliss Spa at the W Hotel is truly the hostess with the mostest. With Mani-pedi stations equipped with personal headsets, flatscreen TVs, high-tech women’s locker rooms with some serious perks, and brownies that are as sweet as can be, Bliss truly offers superior ‘spa-ing’.
Whether you opt to have you and your friends enjoy relaxing massages, facials, or any other services, a Bliss Spa Bridal shower will provide a tranquil and fun experience that will leave you feeling fulfilled and renewed. Bottom line? Bliss Spa’s bridal and ladies night out packages are a proposal you can’t refuse. ’Vow’ to pamper yourself before the big day with decadent packages designed to make the bride and her entire bridal party look and feel their best.
A blissful escape awaits you…
Stylist: Zoey Gulmi
Photography: Lisa Richov
Hair: Elle Cohen of Salon Mario Russo
Flower Arrangements: Winston Flowers

Now in its fifth year in Boston, Magenta Foundation’s Flash Forward Festival of photography is now running at various locations in Boston. The headlining event, an exhibition of the work of photographer Bill Brett, opens on Friday, May 1 and runs through Sunday, May 3. (There is a public reception on Saturday, May 2 at 7:30 p.m.) The Brett show features 50 photographs from Bill’s latest book, “Boston: Irish.” Boston magazine has a full rundown of the 2015 Flash Forward Festival.

RomeAmong the many pearls of wisdom shared with us as we were packing to leave San Francisco for a six-month stint at the American Academy in Rome a decade ago was this: leave behind that dainty McLaren stroller that your one-year-old has been so happy in, and invest in a jogging stroller.  In fact, the average American toddler vehicle is no match for the ancient stone streets of Rome.  Although little Stassa still had to survive some bone-rattling tours through the Eternal City while hanging onto her bottle for dear life, the sturdy jogging stroller (which we had picked up second-hand before leaving northern California) survived our half-year stay in Rome, and then some.  We subsequently had a ceremony to say goodbye to it in a dumpster on the Greek island of Crete, after it had admirably served its purpose.

Stassa and U.B. touristing in Urbino when she was one-and-a-half.  The other parent is running laps around the inside of this museum!

Stassa and U.B. touristing in Urbino when she was one-and-a-half. The other parent is running laps around the inside of this museum!

One great frustration for us new parents as artists and art historians was having to sacrifice the leisurely strolls through museums that we had cherished in our early years together.  U.B. and I had chosen to raise infant Stassa ourselves, and we didn’t even employ a nanny until we arrived in Rome when she was a year-and-a-half old, and then only for a few hours on alternate mornings.  So usually when we set off to discover Borromini, or Caravaggio, or Bramante, our toddler daughter was with us.  A strategy that worked for us, mostly, was to take along a favorite outdoor-kind-of-toy (Stassa’s was a plastic geodesic kind of ball–a gift from a dear friend in Napa–which didn’t roll very far or bounce at all).  Then, when we set off for a baroque church or an ancient history museum, this was the routine:

PARENT ONE: Entertain junior in the cloister of the church or the piazza in front of the museum, by kicking and tossing the ball back and forth for as long as you can stand it, alternating with a game of peek-a-boo behind the cypress trees, or, if there’s a fountain, play Let’s Get Daddy Wet.  (But not too wet.)

PARENT TWO: Make a mad dash through the galleries or the historic building, making mental or written notes on the highlights to share with Parent One.

When these activities are exhausted, PARENT ONE and PARENT TWO change roles.

A hint that I almost hate to admit to: dash into the gift shop first and quickly review the postcard rack, which inevitably features the “greatest hits” paintings and sculptures on view in the permanent collection galleries, and seek them out first.

This “treasure hunt” strategy has taken a slightly different turn in more recent years since we’re occasionally able to coerce Stassa into spending an hour or so with us inside a museum.  Even for grown-ups, including artistically inclined grown-ups like us, a visit to the Louvre or the Uffizi can seem overwhelming almost from the moment you pass through the entrance.  (If the queues are long enough, it can seem overwhelming BEFORE you go through the front door!)  We have devised some unofficial treasure hunts that are best implemented if your kid has a friend with her to “compete” with.  Recently upon entering the newly re-opened Musée Picasso in Paris, we let Stassa know that her job was to find a goat, a sculpture of a bull’s head, and a painting of Picasso’s son dressed as a harlequin (we might have misguided her on that one).  It kept her somewhat occupied and mostly focused, at least long enough for her parents to enjoy an untroubled hour with the new hanging of the permanent collection in the beautiful Hotel Salé in the Marais, which we had really missed on our last few trips while it was closed for renovations.  At the Louvre, armed with the maps provided at the admissions desk, she and a friend went on a mission devised by their parents to find the route toward five masterpieces: Théodore Géricault’s “The Raft of the Medusa,” the Winged Victory of Samothrace, the Venus de Milo, Jacques-Louis David’s “The Coronation of Napoleon,” and of course, the Mona Lisa, barely visible–from their ten-year-old perspective–over the heads of a zillion visitors taking pictures with their iPhones of a distant portrait behind a couple layers of glass.

THE TREASURE HUNT STRATEGY:

It’s too bad scooters aren’t allowed in the Louvre, as we’ve found our lives radically altered by the fairly modest purchase of three two-wheeled vehicles that we use to zip around the flatter parts of our home city, Barcelona.  Since we live in the Gothic Quarter, where few cars can fit through the narrow stone canyons, the scooter provides a terrific alternative to walking.  We’ve found that by rolling rather than walking, the family can cover a lot more ground before the moaning about when-are-we-gonna-get-there begins.  Local sporting goods stores like the French Decathlon sell adult scooters for as little as 79 euros, a small investment equal to a couple of taxi rides.*

TRAVELING EURO STYLE:

When we do take road trips (and we do!) we’ve been amazed at our daughter’s powers of concentration if an audio book is playing on the car speakers.  Assuming you can pry her iPad away from her, the magic provided by listening to a fictional (or non-fictional) tale that somehow relates to the countryside that you’re traveling through, is immeasurable.  We played “The Little Prince” and some tales from Jules Verne for Stassa on a drive from Spain toward Bordeaux.  And on road trips in the USA, a place that she likes to visit, but doesn’t really relate to culturally, she has delighted in hearing the adventures of Laura, Mary and Baby Carrie in “Little House on the Prairie” (voiced by actress Cherry Jones in the version that we bought on line).  Steinbeck’s “Travels With Charley” was less successful; maybe we’ll save that for next time.  We’ve just bought both “The Yearling” and “The Old Man and the Sea” for an upcoming trip to Florida, but we’re not sure that either of us drivers will be able to see to navigate through our tears.  Maybe we’ll just let her watch “The Deathly Hallows” on our way to Harry Potter’s Wizarding World…

Here is a link to Decathlon’s webpage that shows a range of adult scooter prices.

Walk for Hunger

Ellen Parker, the executive director of the anti-hunger organization Project Bread, is a leader in the national dialogue on poverty and hunger as a health crisis. During her tenure at Project Bread the organization has raised more than $100 million to help children and families who struggle to find their next meal. A major portion of those funds come from the East Boston-based Project Bread’s annual Walk for Hunger. On Sunday, May 3, the 47th annual Walk will take place. Ellen is a former senior policy adviser to Boston Mayor Ray Flynn and worked at area social service agencies before taking charge of Project Bread 16 years ago. A stylish, sought-after speaker with a professorial command of the devastating effects of hunger and nutrition, Ellen also knows her way around Boston’s neighborhoods, where she loves to shop and sample the traditional fare of the city’s newest immigrants.

Everyone knows about the Walk for Hunger, what else should people know about Project Bread?

As the only statewide anti-hunger organization in Massachusetts, Project Bread works to promote sustainable and reliable access to healthy food for all. Put simply, we want to end the public health crisis that is grounded in economic inequality and a fragmented food system. That’s why we work so hard to invest in the strength and resiliency of local communities—particularly in the public schools systems. There is no reason why children should leave school hungrie than when they arrived in the morning. And, we collaborate with others in building a robust regional food system from farmers, to food producers, to stores, anyone in the chain.

2014 Masses Shot

Project Bread’s Walk for Hunger is the most prominent in the country. Why is it so important to have regular people raising money and not just raise money in larger amounts from foundations or corporations?

The Walk for Hunger is a way for everyone to give back and raise awareness for anti-hunger work.  It is a movement that is much larger than a single donor, corporation or foundation. More than 40,000 people come together and show their support by walking 20 miles. Now that is a powerful message.

How is Project Bread different from other anti-hunger organizations? Does “anti-hunger” adequately describe your mission?

Project Bread is very much about that old, but wonderful saying: “Give a person a hand up, not a hand out.” People in the United States are so accustomed to seeing hunger within the narrow framework of charity and dependence that we think we know the answer. But we haven’t asked the most obvious question: how does the person facing food insecurity see their situation—and what do they truly need? If they had real choices about the kind of help they could receive, what would they choose and why? The most effective anti-hunger investments deliver multiple benefits. A healthy meal, first and foremost, but what if that meal could lead to new skills and better health? That’s what we call a “hand up.”

Is there a typical profile of a Massachusetts resident in need of food assistance? Is the need stronger in certain parts of the state than in others?

MPHA Award - Ellen and Kirk David LeiferNo, unfortunately we cannot predict where and when people will face this. Everyone has a different story. Everyone has a different background. What we do know is that those who are earning minimum wage or less are typically in need of food assistance. For too many working families—thousands of families in Massachusetts—no matter how hard they work, they cannot reliably protect themselves from hunger. The long-term answer is simple: people need to earn a living wage.

What’s a common misconception about hunger both in Massachusetts and nationwide?

When the head of household works fulltime, her or she should earn enough money to pay the rent and put food on the table. That is not a reality. To achieve that outcome requires broad collaboration among wage earners and political, civic, religious and business leaders. But, interestingly, anti-hunger advocates across the country are will to speak up for charity, but when challenged to speak out for a living wage, those same leaders are conspicuous by their silence.

You live and work in one of the most ethnically diverse neighborhoods Boston. Any favorite places you like to eat and go food shopping?

East Boston has some of the best food in the city. I love Angela’s on Eagle Hill and everyone in the office knows about Rino’s because it was featured on the Food Network. My go-to is Meridian Market, a favorite of the late Mayor Tom Menino. I also love shopping at Market Basket for the fresh food and the company’s commitment to the community. Now that spring is in the air, I can’t wait to revisit our local famer’s market. East Boston has residents from all over the globe and the local market reflects those cultures.  On a given day I can find anything from papalo, a South American version on arugula, to Asian mustard to collard greens to sweet Thai basil.

ART TALK 10_Vanitas, or Models (An Homage to Goya's 'Majas on a Balcony'), 2006First interested in the arts at 16 and still painting nearly every day at 93 years old, Anne Lyman Powers has had a prolific artistic career – to put it mildly. Born in Boston and educated at institutions such as Vassar, Columbia and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Powers devoted any free time she had growing up to studying, painting and sculpture.   An early influence on her work was politics, reinforced by her experience traveling in pre-WWII Europe. In 1937, at 15 years old, Powers got a firsthand glimpse of Nazi Germany and its propaganda campaign against contemporary art, branding the work of modernists and expressionists as “Degenerate.”   Powers herself would explore expressionist work in her painting, and back home in Boston, aligned herself with the Boston Expressionists. Later, changes in her personal life also meant changes in her art. Once married, Powers turned to her everyday life to mine it for subject matter – capturing vacation spots, social gatherings, and her family.   However, her eye for political satire didn’t remain dormant for long, and she continues to explore political themes in her work to this day.

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Terri Stanley was fortunate enough to interview the late Evelyn Lauder in 2010 for season 2 of styleboston. Mrs. Lauder told us that the idea for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation’s “Think Pink” and its pink ribbons was hatched over a cup of coffee at her kitchen table, and has grown into a worldwide campaign. A true lady, Mrs. Lauder could teach people a thing or two about grace.  Watch this Power Player segment below and continue on for more information about the 2015 Boston Hot Pink. (styleboston will be on site at this year’s gala to catch all the action for a good cause.)

“I’ve never met a more gracious woman. She was without pretense or arrogance–truly amazing.”

-Terri Stanley

The BCRF is celebrating its 10th year anivarsary Thursday, May 14th at the Seaport World Trade Center.

Boston Hot PinkHonoring:
ELIZABETH HURLEY
The Estee Lauder Companies Global Ambassador for
Breast Cancer Awareness
AMY ROBACH & ANDREW SHUE
National Humanitarians
BCRF 2014-2015 NEW ENGLAND GRANTEES 
Local Scientific Research Pioneers
CONNECT W/THE BCRF:
#HotPinkBOS #InYourHands

 

 

Chewy 1styleboston and my family lost a very dear and loyal friend yesterday and I would like to say a few words about this special little guy. 
#1-he either liked you or he did not…and it was usually not. Chewy was a Brussels Griffon, a funny and spirited breed that always prefers one on one’s to an open door invite. He was a fierce watchdog and could rumble with the best of the Goldens and Labs.
#2-He does NOT look like the “Star Wars” character Chewbacca, Chewbacca looks like him. Apparently George Lucas had several Griffons when he created the infamous character so let’s get the record straight once and for all… I believe that really irked Chewy.
#3-For such a little guy he instilled a lot of fear in some people. Numbering a dozen or so at last count, he’s a “take no prisoners” kind of guy…likes a good nip here and there. But if he loved you, he really loved you.

Rest in peace Chewy, we miss you already ♥

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Vision

I was invited to serve as a professional reviewer for the Fashion Design Department at MassArt. It’s an honor to be invited to participate in this Review, and my third year being asked back. I took a close look at the portfolios, sketches, and actual garments of the four students I was assigned. Get to know the four fabulous and fashionable students below and take a peek at their designs. styleboston will be on site for the event titled “Vision” — taking place at The Castle on Columbus Ave on May 9’th.

Daniela Cabal

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Kimberly Gale Nowers

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Carolina Espaillat

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Nicole Oppedisano

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Eric Levin decided it was time to take a day of indulgence to a whole new level. styleboston visits Hidden Pond in Kennebunkport, Maine. Featuring a “farm-to-fork” dining room named Earth, massage sessions in a tree house, and an afternoon of yoga and cavorting on the beach.

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